Lovelorn Dolls - After Dark
Goth, Electrometal Here's an EP from Belgian goth-electro-metal act Lovelorn Dolls, featuring a radio style edit and seven remixes. Fair enough, if you want an album with all original songs, you can buy their latest release 'House of Wonders' and skip this one. But if the track "After Dark" from that release really grabs you, then this disc is packed full of re-worked versions of it.

The title track itself is pretty good, serving up some pretty solid goth metal with a healthy dose of well thought out synths. I'm not going to criticize Kristell's vocals, as I honestly think that she is a very talented singer. But what bugs me is the effects that seem to constrain her voice, which just seem to take a bit of the passion out of the delivery. It's a small consideration though, as overall this is a great track that has been well received in a lot of places.

Now, onto the remixes. I'm sorry, but I can't classify the Kant Kino or Chemical Sweet Kid remixes as anything but a mess. I realize that sometimes it is really hard to work with very melodic vocal lines, as is the case here. But I don't think that there's much point in releasing something if it doesn't work, and... feel free to disagree, but I don't think that these remixes quite work out in terms of melody or style.

I was a bit apprehensive about listening to the Jazz Version. Then I heard a needle dropping into a into a wax groove to reveal a Rhodes piano dishing up an understated but soulful melody. In the context of a smoky jazz club, Kristell's vocals really shine here. Her voice here is revealed as confident and sultry, with an upfront sense of presence that really hits the spot with this kind of sound. One of the highlights of the release, for sure.

The Halo In Reverse version is disconcerting. It has its moments, but the weird effects that are scattered throughout the track mostly put me off. I couldn't even take a stab at a genre for this trippy remix. And as if I wasn't disorientated enough, along came the Ethan Fawkes remix. Metal guitars, muted kick beats, and then... a horror soundtrack comes out of nowhere. It's not bad by any means, I just don't get it.

And then... I heard the Aesthetische remix. For me, this is hands down the best track on the album, and it just got itself a guaranteed spot on my next DJ set. Crossing Kristell's voice with a mainroom uplifting trance styled track is a very nice move indeed.

So what's the verdict? I really feel that I've given this release a fair shot. It has its ups and downs, but overall it isn't bad. Maybe have a listen to the Aesthetische remix, and if you like that then you might get into the rest.
3
Brutal Resonance

Lovelorn Dolls - After Dark

6.5
"Alright"
N/A
Electroracle
Spotify
Released 2013 by Alfa-Matrix
Here's an EP from Belgian goth-electro-metal act Lovelorn Dolls, featuring a radio style edit and seven remixes. Fair enough, if you want an album with all original songs, you can buy their latest release 'House of Wonders' and skip this one. But if the track "After Dark" from that release really grabs you, then this disc is packed full of re-worked versions of it.

The title track itself is pretty good, serving up some pretty solid goth metal with a healthy dose of well thought out synths. I'm not going to criticize Kristell's vocals, as I honestly think that she is a very talented singer. But what bugs me is the effects that seem to constrain her voice, which just seem to take a bit of the passion out of the delivery. It's a small consideration though, as overall this is a great track that has been well received in a lot of places.

Now, onto the remixes. I'm sorry, but I can't classify the Kant Kino or Chemical Sweet Kid remixes as anything but a mess. I realize that sometimes it is really hard to work with very melodic vocal lines, as is the case here. But I don't think that there's much point in releasing something if it doesn't work, and... feel free to disagree, but I don't think that these remixes quite work out in terms of melody or style.

I was a bit apprehensive about listening to the Jazz Version. Then I heard a needle dropping into a into a wax groove to reveal a Rhodes piano dishing up an understated but soulful melody. In the context of a smoky jazz club, Kristell's vocals really shine here. Her voice here is revealed as confident and sultry, with an upfront sense of presence that really hits the spot with this kind of sound. One of the highlights of the release, for sure.

The Halo In Reverse version is disconcerting. It has its moments, but the weird effects that are scattered throughout the track mostly put me off. I couldn't even take a stab at a genre for this trippy remix. And as if I wasn't disorientated enough, along came the Ethan Fawkes remix. Metal guitars, muted kick beats, and then... a horror soundtrack comes out of nowhere. It's not bad by any means, I just don't get it.

And then... I heard the Aesthetische remix. For me, this is hands down the best track on the album, and it just got itself a guaranteed spot on my next DJ set. Crossing Kristell's voice with a mainroom uplifting trance styled track is a very nice move indeed.

So what's the verdict? I really feel that I've given this release a fair shot. It has its ups and downs, but overall it isn't bad. Maybe have a listen to the Aesthetische remix, and if you like that then you might get into the rest. Aug 11 2013

Julian Nichols

info@brutalresonance.com
Writer and contributor on Brutal Resonance

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