Lords of Acid - Deep Chills
Techno, Electro-Industrial Lords of Acid is back with a full-length album - finally - it's been 12 years since their last studio album. The band has changed label to Metropolis and have also changed band members completely with one exeption, the founder of the band Praga Khan. The album was realeased on April 10.

The first track on the album "Little Mighty Rabbit" has previously been released on an EP with mixes from a number of big names. "Little Mighty Rabbit" gives a good indication to whats ahead, Lords of Acid are loyal to their track record of explicit lyrics as well as their cheerful industrial acid techno sound.

On the fourth track "Sole sucker" the vocals are brutal and strong, the song fits perfectly to vocalist DJ Meas voice, she lifts the otherwise quite monotonous music of this track. "Pop that Tooshie" follows as track number five, it features pornstar Alana Evans. I personally feel that "Pop that Tooshie" is kind of a let down, Lords of Acid has a reputation of going over the top but this track would blush next to Destinys Childs "Bootylicious", it's catchy and sweet but doesn't bring anything new vocally or musically.

Back to fantastic - considering my doubts concerning the change of lineup DJ Mea erases all such thoughts, "The Love Bus" brings up the groove with a cheezy yet inspiring tune and DJ Meas cool and confident vocals. "Children of Acid" is said to be a tribute to Lords of Acids fans, a cool and solid track well suited for a sweaty dance experience.

"Hot Magma" featuring Praga Khan himself pretty much delivers what is promised in the lyrics, it "fucks you up", it's a strangely suggestive track that brings a new level to the album. The moans and groans are to die for and the track certainly deserves to be put on repeat, it's definately one of my favourites on the album.

Track ten "Censorship Blows", well the title pretty much speaks for itself. Censorship blows.
Track eleven and twelve, "Slip'n Slide" and "Mary, Queen of Slots" are OK, no more no less. If not for track 13 "Paranormal Energy" the album would have slid through my fingers right about here. "Paranormal Energy" is interesting and feels fresh, the vocals go from high to low and the track features Zak Bagans. Supposedly Praga Khans computer took over and changed the song as he was working with it... hm...

I can't help but love hidden tracks, the one on "Deep Chills" is especially fun since it's actually really good.

What's the verdict then? Well, Lords of Acid is what it is, they deliver really good party music with naughty lyrics. "Deep Chills" doesn't bring me any long lasting chills though, it's a good album, well produced and easy to listen to but not fantastic. It lacks some of the wow-factor Lords of Acids previous albums had, although the awesomeness can still be detected in the few tracks that really shine like "Hot Magma", "Paranormal Energy", "Sole sucker" and "Children of Acid".
3
Brutal Resonance

Lords of Acid - Deep Chills

Lords of Acid is back with a full-length album - finally - it's been 12 years since their last studio album. The band has changed label to Metropolis and have also changed band members completely with one exeption, the founder of the band Praga Khan. The album was realeased on April 10.

The first track on the album "Little Mighty Rabbit" has previously been released on an EP with mixes from a number of big names. "Little Mighty Rabbit" gives a good indication to whats ahead, Lords of Acid are loyal to their track record of explicit lyrics as well as their cheerful industrial acid techno sound.

On the fourth track "Sole sucker" the vocals are brutal and strong, the song fits perfectly to vocalist DJ Meas voice, she lifts the otherwise quite monotonous music of this track. "Pop that Tooshie" follows as track number five, it features pornstar Alana Evans. I personally feel that "Pop that Tooshie" is kind of a let down, Lords of Acid has a reputation of going over the top but this track would blush next to Destinys Childs "Bootylicious", it's catchy and sweet but doesn't bring anything new vocally or musically.

Back to fantastic - considering my doubts concerning the change of lineup DJ Mea erases all such thoughts, "The Love Bus" brings up the groove with a cheezy yet inspiring tune and DJ Meas cool and confident vocals. "Children of Acid" is said to be a tribute to Lords of Acids fans, a cool and solid track well suited for a sweaty dance experience.

"Hot Magma" featuring Praga Khan himself pretty much delivers what is promised in the lyrics, it "fucks you up", it's a strangely suggestive track that brings a new level to the album. The moans and groans are to die for and the track certainly deserves to be put on repeat, it's definately one of my favourites on the album.

Track ten "Censorship Blows", well the title pretty much speaks for itself. Censorship blows.
Track eleven and twelve, "Slip'n Slide" and "Mary, Queen of Slots" are OK, no more no less. If not for track 13 "Paranormal Energy" the album would have slid through my fingers right about here. "Paranormal Energy" is interesting and feels fresh, the vocals go from high to low and the track features Zak Bagans. Supposedly Praga Khans computer took over and changed the song as he was working with it... hm...

I can't help but love hidden tracks, the one on "Deep Chills" is especially fun since it's actually really good.

What's the verdict then? Well, Lords of Acid is what it is, they deliver really good party music with naughty lyrics. "Deep Chills" doesn't bring me any long lasting chills though, it's a good album, well produced and easy to listen to but not fantastic. It lacks some of the wow-factor Lords of Acids previous albums had, although the awesomeness can still be detected in the few tracks that really shine like "Hot Magma", "Paranormal Energy", "Sole sucker" and "Children of Acid".
Apr 21 2012

Mary Slevin Sax

info@brutalresonance.com
Writer and contributor on Brutal Resonance

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