Kevorkian Death Cycle - I AM GOD
Electro-Industrial It's with no doubt that ever since their return with 2013's God Am I, a huge clamor rose from the dust, and once again fans and critics alike were calling the album some of Kevorkian Death Cycle's best work (seriously, though, check out their cover of It's A Sin, it's great). And, so, it comes as no surprise that two years later we are seeing another full length album from this four man group. Reverse the title of 2013's return album, and you can give a hearty hello to 2015's I AM GOD.

The title itself will certainly please those grammar Nazis who had panic attacks over God Am I's title, but will also reach fan expectations with an hour's worth of electro-industrial hits. Wind starts us off, and gives the whole minute long ambient, space feeling introduction, followed by another minute's worth of sounds and drum work that will slowly build into the body of the song. Guitars, more synths, and Gribbin's vocals shine light in the song.

Another Day follows through entirely with well scripted lyrics and content that matches the song's duration. This is a five minutes and fifty second ballad filled with constantly evolving sounds and absolutely uplifting electronic elements. Prey To God comes in with an EBM flair pusling throughout the entirety of the song. Say goodbye to the guitar work during the verse, as strict electronics take over, but they come back in with great style during chorus. That would be thanks to Gribbin, or Greg Ripes, or both, as they both are credited as the guitarists of the band.

Tempest II is quiet in comparison to the previous two songs, and I dare say that there's a western atmosphere presented in this song. If I ever get to write out a western and direct it as a film, you can bet your ass this song will be in there somewhere as a moving piece across a desert as the sun sets and the heroes of the film are down and beaten. They will rise once more, as the song as a sort of emotional, but positive vibe to it.

Distorted Religion was released prior to the album as a single with a B-side track and two remixes attached, so just click the link right there to get my opinions on it. I Have No Time had a quiet stomp to it riddled with digital effects I would liken to old horror films, but the real catch of the song comes later on down the line as the smooth guitar and vocal work merge together.

I Am God brings forth a feverish combination of all the band's talents, as would well be expected at this point considering this is the title track of the song. Especially the instrumental section that starts at the three minute and forty second mark. It's just a jam session where the drums, synths, and guitar work come together for thirty seconds and have a lovely orgy together.

And, hell, what do you know? The Raven's Fly actually comes in with some major synthpop influence, and it was a delightful surprise to be found on the album. Don't expect a full on synthpop song, however; it still has more crisp and hard elements to keep it at a sort of crossbreed level.

And if there's any one song where drums really come to life, you should go no further than to look at The Promise. Don't get me wrong, the cinematic synths are perfect, but there was something about the drum work that really got to me. I couldn't really find anything to say about Deconstruction, but I suppose the vocals are the most distorted that they've gotten on the album so far. It's not bad, not good, but sort of, "Ehhhh, it works."

Lastly, The Gathering gives off a very peculiar spoken word story plays throughout the entire seven and a half minute duration. The content of the song, mainly the lyrics and how they're delivered, can certainly be up for multiple interpretations, however, I just took it for the thoughts of someone dealing with a dark situation in life. Maybe yours will be different.

But, yes, this is a dandy release, although I do find the word dandy to sound a little dull to describe I AM GOD. But, considering that the title itself references such a divine being that millions of people worship, I can further say that this album does sound as if there was a divine touch upon it. Although that divine touch is actually coming from four very skilled musicians united under one banner. Cheers to all of them and much respect to crafting such a well produced and gorgeous album.

4
Brutal Resonance

Kevorkian Death Cycle - I AM GOD

It's with no doubt that ever since their return with 2013's God Am I, a huge clamor rose from the dust, and once again fans and critics alike were calling the album some of Kevorkian Death Cycle's best work (seriously, though, check out their cover of It's A Sin, it's great). And, so, it comes as no surprise that two years later we are seeing another full length album from this four man group. Reverse the title of 2013's return album, and you can give a hearty hello to 2015's I AM GOD.

The title itself will certainly please those grammar Nazis who had panic attacks over God Am I's title, but will also reach fan expectations with an hour's worth of electro-industrial hits. Wind starts us off, and gives the whole minute long ambient, space feeling introduction, followed by another minute's worth of sounds and drum work that will slowly build into the body of the song. Guitars, more synths, and Gribbin's vocals shine light in the song.

Another Day follows through entirely with well scripted lyrics and content that matches the song's duration. This is a five minutes and fifty second ballad filled with constantly evolving sounds and absolutely uplifting electronic elements. Prey To God comes in with an EBM flair pusling throughout the entirety of the song. Say goodbye to the guitar work during the verse, as strict electronics take over, but they come back in with great style during chorus. That would be thanks to Gribbin, or Greg Ripes, or both, as they both are credited as the guitarists of the band.

Tempest II is quiet in comparison to the previous two songs, and I dare say that there's a western atmosphere presented in this song. If I ever get to write out a western and direct it as a film, you can bet your ass this song will be in there somewhere as a moving piece across a desert as the sun sets and the heroes of the film are down and beaten. They will rise once more, as the song as a sort of emotional, but positive vibe to it.

Distorted Religion was released prior to the album as a single with a B-side track and two remixes attached, so just click the link right there to get my opinions on it. I Have No Time had a quiet stomp to it riddled with digital effects I would liken to old horror films, but the real catch of the song comes later on down the line as the smooth guitar and vocal work merge together.

I Am God brings forth a feverish combination of all the band's talents, as would well be expected at this point considering this is the title track of the song. Especially the instrumental section that starts at the three minute and forty second mark. It's just a jam session where the drums, synths, and guitar work come together for thirty seconds and have a lovely orgy together.

And, hell, what do you know? The Raven's Fly actually comes in with some major synthpop influence, and it was a delightful surprise to be found on the album. Don't expect a full on synthpop song, however; it still has more crisp and hard elements to keep it at a sort of crossbreed level.

And if there's any one song where drums really come to life, you should go no further than to look at The Promise. Don't get me wrong, the cinematic synths are perfect, but there was something about the drum work that really got to me. I couldn't really find anything to say about Deconstruction, but I suppose the vocals are the most distorted that they've gotten on the album so far. It's not bad, not good, but sort of, "Ehhhh, it works."

Lastly, The Gathering gives off a very peculiar spoken word story plays throughout the entire seven and a half minute duration. The content of the song, mainly the lyrics and how they're delivered, can certainly be up for multiple interpretations, however, I just took it for the thoughts of someone dealing with a dark situation in life. Maybe yours will be different.

But, yes, this is a dandy release, although I do find the word dandy to sound a little dull to describe I AM GOD. But, considering that the title itself references such a divine being that millions of people worship, I can further say that this album does sound as if there was a divine touch upon it. Although that divine touch is actually coming from four very skilled musicians united under one banner. Cheers to all of them and much respect to crafting such a well produced and gorgeous album.

Apr 09 2015

Steven Gullotta

info@brutalresonance.com
I've been writing for Brutal Resonance since November of 2012 and now serve as the editor-in-chief. I love the dark electronic underground and usually have too much to listen to at once but I love it. I am also an editor at Aggressive Deprivation, a digital/physical magazine since March of 2016. I support the scene as much as I can from my humble laptop.

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