Ironhand - Suffering, and the Storm of Obsidian Alloy
Industrial Metal

Suffering, and the Storm of Obsidian Alloy
allows Ironhand to mark another notch for his bountiful amount of releases, but also marks a defining moment in the musician's career. Heretic Prime, also known for his contributions to the industrial-metal project Sarcophagic, has had a whirlwind career since his launch in 2006 - and possibly even before that. Experimenting with the raw energy of black metal and the sheer harsh electronic weight of industrial, you would think that Heretic Prime would eventually run out of creative room. But, to him - as I can clearly see with his new six track EP - there is always room to add in something a little more. 

Self-described by the musician himself, he sought to merge the sounds of black metal and industrial in a way he had not heard before. What most industrial/black metal crossover bands do is insert black metal vocals into industrial and distort the song. But Heretic Prime thought otherwise - he sought to take the raw, lo-fi edge of black metal and cross EBM elements into it. What emerges is a powerful force to be reckoned with. 

I will say that some of the songs on the album were more black metal than anything - particular the opening track 'Of Intoxicating Agony' and 'In Despair' - but they were also equally as punishing and brutal. The atmospheric element to each song sought to bring down the walls surrounding me - but somehow they withstood the onslaught.

Perhaps the best example on the album representing Heretic Prime's vision for picture perfect industrial/black metal was in the fourth track titled 'The Anaesthetic of Time'. The dark and gruesome tale that was unwoven before me spoke of tormented landscapes and burned villages. A ritualistic like rhythm of disorganized electronic chaos, hypnotic guitars, and overall chaos was beautiful. This by far is one of my favorite songs to have ever come from Heretic Prime and I have been having it on repeat for quite some time now. 

The album also features the finest guitar work from Heretic Prime I have heard in his entire discography. Though the noise in songs such as 'Eyes Wide Pointing Nowhere' are pummeling, it is not odd for me to dig through all that just to have the guitar lead the entire rhythm of the song. It is as if the guitar is the wave with everything else taking a ride along with it - and I would have it no other way. 

Suffering, and the Storm of Obsidian Alloy is quite short, which is a bit of a disappointment, but it is also an example of quality over quantity. I love the fact that I wished that 'The Anaesthetic of Time' was longer, as it has me with a desire to go back to it over and over and over again. So long as Heretic Prime continues in this direction, I see no reason as to why he can't continue to build both himself and his fanbase to a new high. 
4
Brutal Resonance

Ironhand - Suffering, and the Storm of Obsidian Alloy

8.0
"Great"
Released off label 2017


Suffering, and the Storm of Obsidian Alloy
allows Ironhand to mark another notch for his bountiful amount of releases, but also marks a defining moment in the musician's career. Heretic Prime, also known for his contributions to the industrial-metal project Sarcophagic, has had a whirlwind career since his launch in 2006 - and possibly even before that. Experimenting with the raw energy of black metal and the sheer harsh electronic weight of industrial, you would think that Heretic Prime would eventually run out of creative room. But, to him - as I can clearly see with his new six track EP - there is always room to add in something a little more. 

Self-described by the musician himself, he sought to merge the sounds of black metal and industrial in a way he had not heard before. What most industrial/black metal crossover bands do is insert black metal vocals into industrial and distort the song. But Heretic Prime thought otherwise - he sought to take the raw, lo-fi edge of black metal and cross EBM elements into it. What emerges is a powerful force to be reckoned with. 

I will say that some of the songs on the album were more black metal than anything - particular the opening track 'Of Intoxicating Agony' and 'In Despair' - but they were also equally as punishing and brutal. The atmospheric element to each song sought to bring down the walls surrounding me - but somehow they withstood the onslaught.

Perhaps the best example on the album representing Heretic Prime's vision for picture perfect industrial/black metal was in the fourth track titled 'The Anaesthetic of Time'. The dark and gruesome tale that was unwoven before me spoke of tormented landscapes and burned villages. A ritualistic like rhythm of disorganized electronic chaos, hypnotic guitars, and overall chaos was beautiful. This by far is one of my favorite songs to have ever come from Heretic Prime and I have been having it on repeat for quite some time now. 

The album also features the finest guitar work from Heretic Prime I have heard in his entire discography. Though the noise in songs such as 'Eyes Wide Pointing Nowhere' are pummeling, it is not odd for me to dig through all that just to have the guitar lead the entire rhythm of the song. It is as if the guitar is the wave with everything else taking a ride along with it - and I would have it no other way. 

Suffering, and the Storm of Obsidian Alloy is quite short, which is a bit of a disappointment, but it is also an example of quality over quantity. I love the fact that I wished that 'The Anaesthetic of Time' was longer, as it has me with a desire to go back to it over and over and over again. So long as Heretic Prime continues in this direction, I see no reason as to why he can't continue to build both himself and his fanbase to a new high. 
Sep 24 2017

Off label

Official release released by the artist themselves without the backing of a label.

Steven Gullotta

info@brutalresonance.com
I've been writing for Brutal Resonance since November of 2012 and now serve as the editor-in-chief. I love the dark electronic underground and usually have too much to listen to at once but I love it. I am also an editor at Aggressive Deprivation, a digital/physical magazine since March of 2016. I support the scene as much as I can from my humble laptop.

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