Inxera Syndrome - Odd-Man Hypothesis
Electro-Industrial Ah, what a pleasant surprise. An album that graciously borrows its title from "The Andromeda Strain", a novel from 1969 written by Michael Crichton. And, how fitting, as well, considering it was a techno-thriller novel, and everyone (at least almost everyone) in the electro-industrial arena so happens to enjoy anything and everything science fiction related. However, the title itself refers to how, in a fictional test, unmarried men are more likely to detonate a facility killing many in order to prevent an extraterrestrial life form from escaping. However, in the case of the album, I would never want to seal this music away from the public.

As the title of the album would suggest, almost all of the songs are inspired by science fiction, whether it's from the guitar fusing "Where Is My Human being", or the comically titled, "Eat Vegans". The inspirations are very well shown, and very creative.

Though that may be a fact, I often found myself wanting a few of the songs to end even though they only have an average length of four minutes, and that's never a good sensation to have. I just felt that within the first two minutes, the songs showcased everything that they had, and after it just continued to drag on after that. I wanted more from them, especially considering that they are instrumentals.

Now, the inspirations, as I have already stated, are clear as day. However, as I also said, and I don't normally try and repeat myself whenever it comes to a conclusion, but I found myself enjoying the album more when the songs ended. I did take pride listening to a few of the songs all the way through, such as "7xN Billion Problems", but most just were a drain on me after the first two minutes. And I don't much like to be drained by music; life does that enough for me, as it is.
3
Brutal Resonance

Inxera Syndrome - Odd-Man Hypothesis

6.5
"Alright"
N/A
Electroracle
Released 2013 by Synth-Me
Ah, what a pleasant surprise. An album that graciously borrows its title from "The Andromeda Strain", a novel from 1969 written by Michael Crichton. And, how fitting, as well, considering it was a techno-thriller novel, and everyone (at least almost everyone) in the electro-industrial arena so happens to enjoy anything and everything science fiction related. However, the title itself refers to how, in a fictional test, unmarried men are more likely to detonate a facility killing many in order to prevent an extraterrestrial life form from escaping. However, in the case of the album, I would never want to seal this music away from the public.

As the title of the album would suggest, almost all of the songs are inspired by science fiction, whether it's from the guitar fusing "Where Is My Human being", or the comically titled, "Eat Vegans". The inspirations are very well shown, and very creative.

Though that may be a fact, I often found myself wanting a few of the songs to end even though they only have an average length of four minutes, and that's never a good sensation to have. I just felt that within the first two minutes, the songs showcased everything that they had, and after it just continued to drag on after that. I wanted more from them, especially considering that they are instrumentals.

Now, the inspirations, as I have already stated, are clear as day. However, as I also said, and I don't normally try and repeat myself whenever it comes to a conclusion, but I found myself enjoying the album more when the songs ended. I did take pride listening to a few of the songs all the way through, such as "7xN Billion Problems", but most just were a drain on me after the first two minutes. And I don't much like to be drained by music; life does that enough for me, as it is. May 06 2013

Steven Gullotta

info@brutalresonance.com
I've been writing for Brutal Resonance since November of 2012 and now serve as the editor-in-chief. I love the dark electronic underground and usually have too much to listen to at once but I love it. I am also an editor at Aggressive Deprivation, a digital/physical magazine since March of 2016. I support the scene as much as I can from my humble laptop.

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