God Body Disconnect - Dredge Portals
Dark Ambient God Body Disconnect has got to be a forerunner in the dark ambient scene as his ideas are new and fresh rather than following the same dulling and repetitive droning chant that so many other artists push forward as creative and intuitive. Based in the Western, foresty New Jersey area in the United States, GBD is the solo project of Bruce Moallem. Starting off as a musician whose early days included being part of death metal and post-rock bands, his dive into these eternal sounds came about from isolation. Finding himself in a dark and deep pit, Moallem found himself finding grace in crafting atmospheric and cinematic tunes - something which was new to him. Looking for other projects that sounded like him, Bandcamp helped him discover his now-label and family Cryo Chamber, and from there it has been history. 

"Dredge Portals" is his debut album, and I'll be willing to announce that it's a fresh of breath air in the genre. Don't expect unending drones that only have a pitch difference once every minute or so; do not expect the same tropes you hear from every other ambient project out there. Expect the sounds of life. Close your eyes and let yourself be moved by the absolute soulful beauty that Moallem instills in your head. This is not just music or background noise. This is the world around you revolving and speaking to you in a way that might make you shed a tear. 

'Rise of the Dormant Host' begins off the album with a short but well spoken story from Moallem himself. Casting himself as a man who - by the sounds played in the album - was either shot or in a car accident lies in a coma wishing someone would pull the plug, Moallem speaks out as he's able to see the world around himself but cannot do anything more than just observe. As such, his view point of the lively world is heard through the music on the album (For those who have seen the 2009 film "Enter The Void", you can use that as reference).

'The Reflection Tower' will take you through sunny parks where children and families laugh and play amongst one another while sirens in the distance roam to another location. I view 'Descend With Demons' as a personal conflict. In comparison to the previous song, it is rather morbid and can be connected with a dank cave. Perhaps this is where the character in the album finds himself struggling with both sadness and anger at the thought of being trapped outside his own body. 

'Heart of the Mirror's Abyss' to myself represents this character's third person adventure to discover a way back to his body. Perhaps he's found a form of repentance, something that gives him a new hope to continue fighting and learn to love what he has and what's been given to him once more. While 'Lost in the Astral World' spews out some more questions - rhetorical or not - that will make you ponder your own life, 'Perpetually Devoured' sounds like a steady wind that whispers to your ears. Lastly, the track 'Dreaming of Glaciers' is relatively optimistic with a beautiful piano rhythm emanating through it. I would like to think that at the end of this track is when the character we have come to know awakens from his coma. 

I know that I have mainly written of a story that is up to interpretation for each and every single person that listens to the album instead of the actual music, but there is some validation in that. "Dredge Portals" is a massive powerhouse of a cinematic album, and I don't think you really understand this album unless you come out of it creating or at least thinking of a narrative that goes along with all the fuss and gorgeous ambient sounds you've heard throughout the album. 

But, either way, "Dredge Portals" is fantastic. It almost rings out like a calling to those who want to give up. When answered, the message is clear and it states that no matter how dreadful the situation might be, don't give up. Never give up. There is poetry found in this music and based on what I've heard today, Moallem has a bright, bright future ahead of himself. 
4
Brutal Resonance

God Body Disconnect - Dredge Portals

8.0
"Great"
N/A
Electroracle
Released 2016 by Cryo Chamber
God Body Disconnect has got to be a forerunner in the dark ambient scene as his ideas are new and fresh rather than following the same dulling and repetitive droning chant that so many other artists push forward as creative and intuitive. Based in the Western, foresty New Jersey area in the United States, GBD is the solo project of Bruce Moallem. Starting off as a musician whose early days included being part of death metal and post-rock bands, his dive into these eternal sounds came about from isolation. Finding himself in a dark and deep pit, Moallem found himself finding grace in crafting atmospheric and cinematic tunes - something which was new to him. Looking for other projects that sounded like him, Bandcamp helped him discover his now-label and family Cryo Chamber, and from there it has been history. 

"Dredge Portals" is his debut album, and I'll be willing to announce that it's a fresh of breath air in the genre. Don't expect unending drones that only have a pitch difference once every minute or so; do not expect the same tropes you hear from every other ambient project out there. Expect the sounds of life. Close your eyes and let yourself be moved by the absolute soulful beauty that Moallem instills in your head. This is not just music or background noise. This is the world around you revolving and speaking to you in a way that might make you shed a tear. 

'Rise of the Dormant Host' begins off the album with a short but well spoken story from Moallem himself. Casting himself as a man who - by the sounds played in the album - was either shot or in a car accident lies in a coma wishing someone would pull the plug, Moallem speaks out as he's able to see the world around himself but cannot do anything more than just observe. As such, his view point of the lively world is heard through the music on the album (For those who have seen the 2009 film "Enter The Void", you can use that as reference).

'The Reflection Tower' will take you through sunny parks where children and families laugh and play amongst one another while sirens in the distance roam to another location. I view 'Descend With Demons' as a personal conflict. In comparison to the previous song, it is rather morbid and can be connected with a dank cave. Perhaps this is where the character in the album finds himself struggling with both sadness and anger at the thought of being trapped outside his own body. 

'Heart of the Mirror's Abyss' to myself represents this character's third person adventure to discover a way back to his body. Perhaps he's found a form of repentance, something that gives him a new hope to continue fighting and learn to love what he has and what's been given to him once more. While 'Lost in the Astral World' spews out some more questions - rhetorical or not - that will make you ponder your own life, 'Perpetually Devoured' sounds like a steady wind that whispers to your ears. Lastly, the track 'Dreaming of Glaciers' is relatively optimistic with a beautiful piano rhythm emanating through it. I would like to think that at the end of this track is when the character we have come to know awakens from his coma. 

I know that I have mainly written of a story that is up to interpretation for each and every single person that listens to the album instead of the actual music, but there is some validation in that. "Dredge Portals" is a massive powerhouse of a cinematic album, and I don't think you really understand this album unless you come out of it creating or at least thinking of a narrative that goes along with all the fuss and gorgeous ambient sounds you've heard throughout the album. 

But, either way, "Dredge Portals" is fantastic. It almost rings out like a calling to those who want to give up. When answered, the message is clear and it states that no matter how dreadful the situation might be, don't give up. Never give up. There is poetry found in this music and based on what I've heard today, Moallem has a bright, bright future ahead of himself. 
Jan 26 2016

Steven Gullotta

info@brutalresonance.com
I've been writing for Brutal Resonance since November of 2012 and now serve as the editor-in-chief. I love the dark electronic underground and usually have too much to listen to at once but I love it. I am also an editor at Aggressive Deprivation, a digital/physical magazine since March of 2016. I support the scene as much as I can from my humble laptop.

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