Ghost Twin - Here We Are In The Night
Synthpop Ghost Twin is the collaboration between musician and filmmakers Karen and Jaimz Asmundson from Winnipeg, Canada. They put out live video performances aside with their music in an attempt to create a full sensory experience. However sad as it may be, I have never had the chance to see them perform live, but I do have the ability to use my ears to listen to their latest EP, "Here We Are In The Night". 

Datk synthpop plays a role in their music, aided by some witchy sounds and hooking synthlines. I think I may have fallen in love upon first listening to this duo's charming beats when I sat down and listened to "Here We Are In The Night". Packed with four new songs and four remixes, you really just cannot go wrong with this EP.

'Chymical Wedding' kicks us off, which shows an understanding of both song structure and technical elements. Many sounds and different electronic bleeps come in and out in perfect unison, never really staying for too long, but sticking around just long enough for the listener to enjoy what's presented before them. The synths that have a sort of retro feel to them are the main attraction to the music, preserving a genuine emotion about them. Pair that with vocal work from Karen that is occasionally layered with Jaimz's own chords, and you have quit e a lovely first song. 

'Mystic Sabbath' brings in a pretty dirty, danceable beat; it honestly sounds like these two had a shit ton of fun recording this song, and the way they sing together in this track is even better than the last. There is definitely passion backing their voice, and that's what's really, really catchy. 

'Here We Are In The Night' provides some slower, dragged out vocals and, as it is, the beat is brought back a notch to match the vocals. I wasn't to keen on Jaimz's voice this time; the whispering, raspy voice her brought along to back Karen was just a bit off in my opinion. But, the song still did me over well. 

'The Vulture' sort of had the same tone that Jaimz brought vocally to the title track, but it was more pronounced and therefore more enjoyable. Acoustic guitar work played a major role in this song, and seeing how each string plucked was louder and more announced than the other electronic sounds, it was swell that it worked well. 

Burglar did a remix titled 'I Don't Want To Be', which is a very cut up, odd mess of sounds and electronic wizardry. Odd, but somewhat good, but the vocals were very deep pitched and kind of bad.  vvinter rainbovv  came along and remixed 'Here We Are In The Night' to 'We Are The Night'. It's similar fashion to Ghost Twin's style, but with just a slightly, alien like twist to it. Well done. Famine remixed 'Mystic Sabbath' into 'Walpurgisnacht', which homed in on the acoustic guitar and drum work, making it sound a little tribal in a few places. And, lastly, Khraken created a noise filled rendition of 'Chymical Wedding'. Eerie, odd, and enjoyable. I liked it. 

But, yes, the remix section was decent, but was nothing compared to what Jaimz and Karen could do originally. Their songs are brilliantly sung and written, and I can only hope to see them perform live at some point in my life. 

For now, I'll just have to enjoy this album as much as I can. This album is also sold in digital, CD, and VHS format. If only I had a working VCR...
4
Brutal Resonance

Ghost Twin - Here We Are In The Night

8.0
"Great"
N/A
Electroracle
Spotify
Released off label 2015
Ghost Twin is the collaboration between musician and filmmakers Karen and Jaimz Asmundson from Winnipeg, Canada. They put out live video performances aside with their music in an attempt to create a full sensory experience. However sad as it may be, I have never had the chance to see them perform live, but I do have the ability to use my ears to listen to their latest EP, "Here We Are In The Night". 

Datk synthpop plays a role in their music, aided by some witchy sounds and hooking synthlines. I think I may have fallen in love upon first listening to this duo's charming beats when I sat down and listened to "Here We Are In The Night". Packed with four new songs and four remixes, you really just cannot go wrong with this EP.

'Chymical Wedding' kicks us off, which shows an understanding of both song structure and technical elements. Many sounds and different electronic bleeps come in and out in perfect unison, never really staying for too long, but sticking around just long enough for the listener to enjoy what's presented before them. The synths that have a sort of retro feel to them are the main attraction to the music, preserving a genuine emotion about them. Pair that with vocal work from Karen that is occasionally layered with Jaimz's own chords, and you have quit e a lovely first song. 

'Mystic Sabbath' brings in a pretty dirty, danceable beat; it honestly sounds like these two had a shit ton of fun recording this song, and the way they sing together in this track is even better than the last. There is definitely passion backing their voice, and that's what's really, really catchy. 

'Here We Are In The Night' provides some slower, dragged out vocals and, as it is, the beat is brought back a notch to match the vocals. I wasn't to keen on Jaimz's voice this time; the whispering, raspy voice her brought along to back Karen was just a bit off in my opinion. But, the song still did me over well. 

'The Vulture' sort of had the same tone that Jaimz brought vocally to the title track, but it was more pronounced and therefore more enjoyable. Acoustic guitar work played a major role in this song, and seeing how each string plucked was louder and more announced than the other electronic sounds, it was swell that it worked well. 

Burglar did a remix titled 'I Don't Want To Be', which is a very cut up, odd mess of sounds and electronic wizardry. Odd, but somewhat good, but the vocals were very deep pitched and kind of bad.  vvinter rainbovv  came along and remixed 'Here We Are In The Night' to 'We Are The Night'. It's similar fashion to Ghost Twin's style, but with just a slightly, alien like twist to it. Well done. Famine remixed 'Mystic Sabbath' into 'Walpurgisnacht', which homed in on the acoustic guitar and drum work, making it sound a little tribal in a few places. And, lastly, Khraken created a noise filled rendition of 'Chymical Wedding'. Eerie, odd, and enjoyable. I liked it. 

But, yes, the remix section was decent, but was nothing compared to what Jaimz and Karen could do originally. Their songs are brilliantly sung and written, and I can only hope to see them perform live at some point in my life. 

For now, I'll just have to enjoy this album as much as I can. This album is also sold in digital, CD, and VHS format. If only I had a working VCR...
Apr 28 2015

Off label

Official relesae released by the artist themselves without the backing of a label.

Steven Gullotta

info@brutalresonance.com
I've been writing for Brutal Resonance since November of 2012 and now serve as the editor-in-chief. I love the dark electronic underground and usually have too much to listen to at once but I love it. I am also an editor at Aggressive Deprivation, a digital/physical magazine since March of 2016. I support the scene as much as I can from my humble laptop.

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