FutureFrenetic - Cyber Music Promo
Industrial, Trance FutureFrenetic is not necessarily a unique project, however, they are good at what they do. Then I again, I don't necessarily have the right to judge that considering I have no idea as to how to make music. Isn't that just one of the biggest ironies behind journalism? BAHA. Anyway, FutureFrenetic is a solo project headed by a man named Paul.

And, I suppose to start off this review, I want to state how much respect I have for solo artists. They make their own music without the help or influences of many others, and it definitely avoids any conflicting ideas. So, the music normally flows out fairly nicely, though it is fairly straightforward and coming from one mind set.

However, that isn't always a bad thing. Not at all, such as in the case of the Cyber Music Promo. I don't necessarily think that the "Promo" part was needed in the title, but whatever keeps you happy keeps you happy. There are six songs on the release, and each one of them are good.

There's definitely a major trance influence on the album, although I would still consider it to be industrialized with the harder beats implemented throughout each of the songs. So, it creates a very dance like atmosphere throughout the whole spiel.

I thought that in some of the songs, the voices were a bit lower than wanted; such as in the case of "E.E.E.V.I.L.". The robotic vocals were pretty awesome, and they do sound as if they were meant to blend with the background as they are musical in of themselves, but they still felt pretty light in comparison.

However, I think the one thing lacking within this release would be that one genuine song that really appeals to my emotions; that one song that kills the rest and is able to give me goosebumps and come off with a satisfied smile; the one song that I would pluck off an album and just say, "This needs to become a music video."

I mean, the songs were good. Nothing bad about them, at all. But they weren't great, or excellent. "P45" was different from the rest in the fact that male vocals were used in cooperation with the robotic voice. And it has an excellent build up to the chorus each time it was about to roll around. But, even then, I still didn't think it was worthy of being held on a high chair.

So, what we have here is a decent EP, a decent release that deserves praise, but not so much praise as was deserving when the Allies won World War II. Sure, that may be a bit of an over exaggeration, but it makes my point a bit more clear in the long run. I want to see more from this project in the future, as I have had a fun time listening to it, I just haven't found reason to stick around with it all too much.
4
Brutal Resonance

FutureFrenetic - Cyber Music Promo

7.0
"Good"
N/A
Electroracle
Released off label 2013
FutureFrenetic is not necessarily a unique project, however, they are good at what they do. Then I again, I don't necessarily have the right to judge that considering I have no idea as to how to make music. Isn't that just one of the biggest ironies behind journalism? BAHA. Anyway, FutureFrenetic is a solo project headed by a man named Paul.

And, I suppose to start off this review, I want to state how much respect I have for solo artists. They make their own music without the help or influences of many others, and it definitely avoids any conflicting ideas. So, the music normally flows out fairly nicely, though it is fairly straightforward and coming from one mind set.

However, that isn't always a bad thing. Not at all, such as in the case of the Cyber Music Promo. I don't necessarily think that the "Promo" part was needed in the title, but whatever keeps you happy keeps you happy. There are six songs on the release, and each one of them are good.

There's definitely a major trance influence on the album, although I would still consider it to be industrialized with the harder beats implemented throughout each of the songs. So, it creates a very dance like atmosphere throughout the whole spiel.

I thought that in some of the songs, the voices were a bit lower than wanted; such as in the case of "E.E.E.V.I.L.". The robotic vocals were pretty awesome, and they do sound as if they were meant to blend with the background as they are musical in of themselves, but they still felt pretty light in comparison.

However, I think the one thing lacking within this release would be that one genuine song that really appeals to my emotions; that one song that kills the rest and is able to give me goosebumps and come off with a satisfied smile; the one song that I would pluck off an album and just say, "This needs to become a music video."

I mean, the songs were good. Nothing bad about them, at all. But they weren't great, or excellent. "P45" was different from the rest in the fact that male vocals were used in cooperation with the robotic voice. And it has an excellent build up to the chorus each time it was about to roll around. But, even then, I still didn't think it was worthy of being held on a high chair.

So, what we have here is a decent EP, a decent release that deserves praise, but not so much praise as was deserving when the Allies won World War II. Sure, that may be a bit of an over exaggeration, but it makes my point a bit more clear in the long run. I want to see more from this project in the future, as I have had a fun time listening to it, I just haven't found reason to stick around with it all too much. May 09 2013

Off label

Official release released by the artist themselves without the backing of a label.

Steven Gullotta

info@brutalresonance.com
I've been writing for Brutal Resonance since November of 2012 and now serve as the editor-in-chief. I love the dark electronic underground and usually have too much to listen to at once but I love it. I am also an editor at Aggressive Deprivation, a digital/physical magazine since March of 2016. I support the scene as much as I can from my humble laptop.

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