Front Line Assembly - Plasticity 2012
EBM, Industrial 'Plasticity' starts off hard and relentless with "Plasticity" a classic floorfiller. The 2nd track, "Relentless" is old-school EBM at its finest. You definitely get a feel for Front Line Assembly's roots here. "Plasticity (Zero remix by Haujobb)" is the final track from their past release from 1996.

The first of the new songs, "Fatalist", starts out with eerie choir-like samples and dark electro groves. When the lyrics kick in, they instantly remind me of a Meat Beat Manifesto song by the name of "Helter Skelter". Its no doubt because of the repeating "Its in my brain". Moving on to "Retribution", the 5th track on the album, and sort of a progressive interlude full of percussions and synths reminiscent of old school techno. Around 2 minutes into the track, "Retribution" kicks in with the beat and its like the soundtrack to plugging into a haunted computer and traveling through its circuitry. "Retribution" is a track you need to listen to again and again with your eyes closed to truly hear what it has to offer.

The 6th track, "Deception", has a distinct drum and bass sound to it, and with its tribal drumming and hard energetic beats, I feel like The Prodigy could have taken part in this song. "Deception" has a familiar sound to it and sometimes its hard to believe its just one song because it changes up so much; its Skinny Puppy meets The Prodigy meets Meat Beat Manifesto meets KMFDM. The old heads will like this track. The 7th track is the"Fatalist (Aqualite remix)", the one track I really didn't care for due to the repetitive guitar riffs and over use of the Meat Beat Manifesto- like "It's in my brain".

Moving on to "Prophecy (Haujobb remix)", the 8th track on the album, the track I really believe should be picked up by a survival horror game designer or a movie producer. "Prophecy (Haujobb remix)" has a creepy feel to it but being coupled with really minimal beats makes it a no-no for club play, but still worth a listen as you go about your regularly scheduled shenanigans.

The next track, number nine, "Fatalist (Tribal techno mix by Aqualite)"; The best remix of "Fatalist" by far. I could easily play this track almost anywhere I would spin as it has multiple elements that fit into many genres including acid and even psy-trance! The 10th track ,"Prophecy (Album version)" comes on like a freight train fueled by jungle, haunting sounds, and possessed drums. EBM meets Jungle meets Velvet Acid Christ is the best way to describe this gem, and honestly, if I didn't know better, I'd sware this track was a product of Velvet Acid Christ.

The 11th track, "Prophecy (Radio Version)" is the shortened radio edit of the 10th track. Moving on to track 12, we have "Prophecy (YK2000 Mix)", a haunting synth ridden ghost train ride that takes you deep inside the world full of distorted, filtered, and flanged lyrics. The roars over the track are atmospheric and add to the experience and even with all of the effects and samples added, this track stayed true to what it was intended to be; Hard, post-apocalyptic industrial.

The final track on the album, "Unknown Dreams (Radio Two)", has the feel of a hidden track. Its also the shortest track on the album clocking in at just under 4 minutes. "Unknown Dreams (Radio Two)"is very much gothy, synthpoppy, and all together very much different then he rest of 'Plasticity'. Almost like this track was written at random or thrown on at the last minute. It's a great song with poignant lyrics, but I cant help but ask where does it fit within this album?!

Front Line Assembly transcends genres on this album showing they can create many sounds and at that, do it all very WELL, but it does seem like they are trying desperately to find an identity. Front Line Assembly has been a staple in the industrial and EBM word for a long, long time and have proved that you can have an old dog keep performing new tricks.
4
Brutal Resonance

Front Line Assembly - Plasticity 2012

7.0
"Good"
N/A
Electroracle
Released 2012 by Infacted Recordings
'Plasticity' starts off hard and relentless with "Plasticity" a classic floorfiller. The 2nd track, "Relentless" is old-school EBM at its finest. You definitely get a feel for Front Line Assembly's roots here. "Plasticity (Zero remix by Haujobb)" is the final track from their past release from 1996.

The first of the new songs, "Fatalist", starts out with eerie choir-like samples and dark electro groves. When the lyrics kick in, they instantly remind me of a Meat Beat Manifesto song by the name of "Helter Skelter". Its no doubt because of the repeating "Its in my brain". Moving on to "Retribution", the 5th track on the album, and sort of a progressive interlude full of percussions and synths reminiscent of old school techno. Around 2 minutes into the track, "Retribution" kicks in with the beat and its like the soundtrack to plugging into a haunted computer and traveling through its circuitry. "Retribution" is a track you need to listen to again and again with your eyes closed to truly hear what it has to offer.

The 6th track, "Deception", has a distinct drum and bass sound to it, and with its tribal drumming and hard energetic beats, I feel like The Prodigy could have taken part in this song. "Deception" has a familiar sound to it and sometimes its hard to believe its just one song because it changes up so much; its Skinny Puppy meets The Prodigy meets Meat Beat Manifesto meets KMFDM. The old heads will like this track. The 7th track is the"Fatalist (Aqualite remix)", the one track I really didn't care for due to the repetitive guitar riffs and over use of the Meat Beat Manifesto- like "It's in my brain".

Moving on to "Prophecy (Haujobb remix)", the 8th track on the album, the track I really believe should be picked up by a survival horror game designer or a movie producer. "Prophecy (Haujobb remix)" has a creepy feel to it but being coupled with really minimal beats makes it a no-no for club play, but still worth a listen as you go about your regularly scheduled shenanigans.

The next track, number nine, "Fatalist (Tribal techno mix by Aqualite)"; The best remix of "Fatalist" by far. I could easily play this track almost anywhere I would spin as it has multiple elements that fit into many genres including acid and even psy-trance! The 10th track ,"Prophecy (Album version)" comes on like a freight train fueled by jungle, haunting sounds, and possessed drums. EBM meets Jungle meets Velvet Acid Christ is the best way to describe this gem, and honestly, if I didn't know better, I'd sware this track was a product of Velvet Acid Christ.

The 11th track, "Prophecy (Radio Version)" is the shortened radio edit of the 10th track. Moving on to track 12, we have "Prophecy (YK2000 Mix)", a haunting synth ridden ghost train ride that takes you deep inside the world full of distorted, filtered, and flanged lyrics. The roars over the track are atmospheric and add to the experience and even with all of the effects and samples added, this track stayed true to what it was intended to be; Hard, post-apocalyptic industrial.

The final track on the album, "Unknown Dreams (Radio Two)", has the feel of a hidden track. Its also the shortest track on the album clocking in at just under 4 minutes. "Unknown Dreams (Radio Two)"is very much gothy, synthpoppy, and all together very much different then he rest of 'Plasticity'. Almost like this track was written at random or thrown on at the last minute. It's a great song with poignant lyrics, but I cant help but ask where does it fit within this album?!

Front Line Assembly transcends genres on this album showing they can create many sounds and at that, do it all very WELL, but it does seem like they are trying desperately to find an identity. Front Line Assembly has been a staple in the industrial and EBM word for a long, long time and have proved that you can have an old dog keep performing new tricks. Aug 15 2012

Raye Albater

info@brutalresonance.com
Writer and contributor on Brutal Resonance

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Started in spring 2009, Brutal Resonance quickly grew from a Swedish based netzine into an established International zine of the highest standard.

We cover genres like Synthpop, EBM, Industrial, Dark Ambient, Neofolk, Darkwave, Noise and all their sub- and similar genres.

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