Empyrean Asunder - HATE: Expanded & Remastered
Industrial, Metal Empyrean Asunder is back, this time attached to a label with an expanded and remastered version of their 2013 release, Hate. While the core experience remains relatively the same as the previous release, let's dive into this new package and see what's new and improved.

As stated in the title of the release, the original five tracks do come along with a shiny new polish. Better balance with all sounds, cleaner vocals and sound makes this version the definitive edition to really clamp your jaws around. It's kind of like light and day with this version and the previous; I found the earlier version to have a shitty, almost demo like quality to it. And while, yes, I could find some parts enjoyable, I really couldn't listen through it. However, with this version, the polish was well granted and beautiful, and created a brand new and worthwhile listening experience. Kudos to Sander Kapper of Stahlblack Productions for the mastering.

Now, also coming along with this expanded edition are a slew of remixes from various artists. Almost Serenity got a remix from both Particle Son and Exemia. Particle Son's version took over with a lot of drum'n'bass, much like the original, and maybe even sounded just too close to the original to really count for much. Exemia, however, breached the hull with some more haunting chimes and synth work added into the mix, creating an experience that they can really call their own.

AudioCentesis gave a club makeover to You Are My Punishment allowing for a more hoppy and jumpy track. The lead vocalist's chords honestly fall perfectly on spot in this mix, and it was amazing as to how well everything fell in place with this track. Major respect to AudioCentesis for putting out such an awesome remix. Corroded Master also remixed the track with a decidedly 80s feel to it. Expect to be sent back to a different era, but don't expect something extremely cheesy; it was done well.

Seraphim System's remix of The Aftermath had a really, really cool beat to it; fast, energetic, and frenzied with plenty of trance elements and wobbles thrown in for good effect. However, I felt as if the slower lyrical delivery didn't go so well with the beat at some points. Sarcophagic's hard hitting version of the track was well done, however, the music greatly overpowered the vocals on an almost constant basis.

Killing Floor was introduced to Ruinizer, and he made a lovely theatrical build up straight into the main bulk of the song. The electronics complimented the vocals well enough, especially when the chords were more digital than human. And, lastly, [product] remix of the song heaved in some heavy drum work with a slower but moving beat. The vocals were fairly subliminal, buried beneath the music, which I didn't appreciate all too much, but the beat was still grand in every sense, so there's that.

And, my overall thoughts on this package is that it was well wrapped and presented to the audience. I have a feeling that this will more or less be a labor of love for already established fans of the band, but it's also a great way to introduce newcomers to the act. HATE: Expanded & Remastered transformed the original tracks from shit quality to a fine professional piece, and the remixes attached weren't half bad. I wouldn't say that I fell in love with this release, or that I found it jaw dropping, but it had its moments and it was worth my time. Check it out for yourself; this is a good starting ground to introduce yourself to Empyrean Asunder.
3
Brutal Resonance

Empyrean Asunder - HATE: Expanded & Remastered

6.5
"Alright"
N/A
Electroracle
Released 2014 by Wax-Heart Records Ltd.
Empyrean Asunder is back, this time attached to a label with an expanded and remastered version of their 2013 release, Hate. While the core experience remains relatively the same as the previous release, let's dive into this new package and see what's new and improved.

As stated in the title of the release, the original five tracks do come along with a shiny new polish. Better balance with all sounds, cleaner vocals and sound makes this version the definitive edition to really clamp your jaws around. It's kind of like light and day with this version and the previous; I found the earlier version to have a shitty, almost demo like quality to it. And while, yes, I could find some parts enjoyable, I really couldn't listen through it. However, with this version, the polish was well granted and beautiful, and created a brand new and worthwhile listening experience. Kudos to Sander Kapper of Stahlblack Productions for the mastering.

Now, also coming along with this expanded edition are a slew of remixes from various artists. Almost Serenity got a remix from both Particle Son and Exemia. Particle Son's version took over with a lot of drum'n'bass, much like the original, and maybe even sounded just too close to the original to really count for much. Exemia, however, breached the hull with some more haunting chimes and synth work added into the mix, creating an experience that they can really call their own.

AudioCentesis gave a club makeover to You Are My Punishment allowing for a more hoppy and jumpy track. The lead vocalist's chords honestly fall perfectly on spot in this mix, and it was amazing as to how well everything fell in place with this track. Major respect to AudioCentesis for putting out such an awesome remix. Corroded Master also remixed the track with a decidedly 80s feel to it. Expect to be sent back to a different era, but don't expect something extremely cheesy; it was done well.

Seraphim System's remix of The Aftermath had a really, really cool beat to it; fast, energetic, and frenzied with plenty of trance elements and wobbles thrown in for good effect. However, I felt as if the slower lyrical delivery didn't go so well with the beat at some points. Sarcophagic's hard hitting version of the track was well done, however, the music greatly overpowered the vocals on an almost constant basis.

Killing Floor was introduced to Ruinizer, and he made a lovely theatrical build up straight into the main bulk of the song. The electronics complimented the vocals well enough, especially when the chords were more digital than human. And, lastly, [product] remix of the song heaved in some heavy drum work with a slower but moving beat. The vocals were fairly subliminal, buried beneath the music, which I didn't appreciate all too much, but the beat was still grand in every sense, so there's that.

And, my overall thoughts on this package is that it was well wrapped and presented to the audience. I have a feeling that this will more or less be a labor of love for already established fans of the band, but it's also a great way to introduce newcomers to the act. HATE: Expanded & Remastered transformed the original tracks from shit quality to a fine professional piece, and the remixes attached weren't half bad. I wouldn't say that I fell in love with this release, or that I found it jaw dropping, but it had its moments and it was worth my time. Check it out for yourself; this is a good starting ground to introduce yourself to Empyrean Asunder. Nov 05 2014

Steven Gullotta

info@brutalresonance.com
I've been writing for Brutal Resonance since November of 2012 and now serve as the editor-in-chief. I love the dark electronic underground and usually have too much to listen to at once but I love it. I am also an editor at Aggressive Deprivation, a digital/physical magazine since March of 2016. I support the scene as much as I can from my humble laptop.

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