ElectroNobody - Nation of Cyborgs
Electronics ElectroNobody is a musical somebody from Russia. Making music since 2000, Vladimir Stepanov intends to create music revolving around the whole soundtrack idea for video games and movies. And, while there isn't much more information to go off of based around this artist, the new EP released by this man consists of six electronic tracks spanning a total of twenty three minutes, filled with all sorts of cyber oddities.

Nation Of Cyborgs, both the title of the EP as well as the title track, starts off the album with a little electronic tune, playing off some stuttering lines and drum and bass that works well. In the latter half of the album, vocals come in, kind of screaming, a little effect on them, and the instrumentation sort of fades with the vocals, echoing each other's sounds.

Human Revolution brings in some metal to the overall equation, garnering a harder sense, but the lighter piano work inter-mingled was also nice. Cyborgs Dreams brought more electronics to the table, once more allowing the drum work to really kick off. The vocals were growling once more, which I think would've fit a little better if the music was a little more aggressive, I think. However, there's plenty of bass to be found within this track, so no worries there.

Indigo Prophecy brought a slower track featuring a singer named Courtney Lee. Slower paced, her voice came off nicely with the beat surrounding it. There was a bit too much breathing in between her lines that was noticeable, which kind of detracted from the experience, but it was overall well sung.

Assault On Dark Athena (likely borrowing the name from the Riddick series) came off heavier, as fitting to the title, and the final song, Cyborgs Riot was fast paced and entertained me through its duration.

And, at the end of the day, I can say I enjoyed getting through this. The electronics and drum work are his powerful assets, whereas everything else, though serving a good purpose, didn't quite make magic happen as I thought it would have. Well done album, but it could use tweaks here and there.
3
Brutal Resonance

ElectroNobody - Nation of Cyborgs

6.5
"Alright"
N/A
Electroracle
Spotify
Released off label 2014
ElectroNobody is a musical somebody from Russia. Making music since 2000, Vladimir Stepanov intends to create music revolving around the whole soundtrack idea for video games and movies. And, while there isn't much more information to go off of based around this artist, the new EP released by this man consists of six electronic tracks spanning a total of twenty three minutes, filled with all sorts of cyber oddities.

Nation Of Cyborgs, both the title of the EP as well as the title track, starts off the album with a little electronic tune, playing off some stuttering lines and drum and bass that works well. In the latter half of the album, vocals come in, kind of screaming, a little effect on them, and the instrumentation sort of fades with the vocals, echoing each other's sounds.

Human Revolution brings in some metal to the overall equation, garnering a harder sense, but the lighter piano work inter-mingled was also nice. Cyborgs Dreams brought more electronics to the table, once more allowing the drum work to really kick off. The vocals were growling once more, which I think would've fit a little better if the music was a little more aggressive, I think. However, there's plenty of bass to be found within this track, so no worries there.

Indigo Prophecy brought a slower track featuring a singer named Courtney Lee. Slower paced, her voice came off nicely with the beat surrounding it. There was a bit too much breathing in between her lines that was noticeable, which kind of detracted from the experience, but it was overall well sung.

Assault On Dark Athena (likely borrowing the name from the Riddick series) came off heavier, as fitting to the title, and the final song, Cyborgs Riot was fast paced and entertained me through its duration.

And, at the end of the day, I can say I enjoyed getting through this. The electronics and drum work are his powerful assets, whereas everything else, though serving a good purpose, didn't quite make magic happen as I thought it would have. Well done album, but it could use tweaks here and there. Sep 18 2014

Off label

Official release released by the artist themselves without the backing of a label.

Steven Gullotta

info@brutalresonance.com
I've been writing for Brutal Resonance since November of 2012 and now serve as the editor-in-chief. I love the dark electronic underground and usually have too much to listen to at once but I love it. I am also an editor at Aggressive Deprivation, a digital/physical magazine since March of 2016. I support the scene as much as I can from my humble laptop.

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