Detritus - Everyday Explanations
Ambient, Classical Somewhere along the lines of listening to this, I put it in my portable cd player and wandered outside through the deserted streets of 4am. I looked up and down the avenue lined with trees and watched their branches swaying in the early morning gusts of wind and then this album began to exfoliate my mind. Smooth breaks combined with melodic pianos to reveal all the lost, lonely faces in this city that I have encountered. In a manner similar to Keef Baker's last record, Detritus' new one accentuates it's sometimes skeletal composition through guitar parts that put some muscle into the equation. These aren't the kind of guitars come that with solos and dry ice in the video, they are an added dimension to an already resplendent arsenal of arcane terrain.

So much of 'Everyday Explanations' feels like a celebration of pure isolation, with many of the songs on here possessed of an incredibly reflective character. You think many thoughts while you play this, the yearning to be whole again is one of them. Definitely a late night treat we have on our hands with this one, put it on and let it to be your guide. Have no concerns other than what you're hearing come out of the speakers, it's like floating in the air on a cloud of never ending remembrance. I think what attracts me most to this album is the cinematic nature it contains, at some times I get reminded of the soundtrack to The Silence of the Lambs even though this has no dancing murderer in silk. Whatever you may think of the state of eclectic electronics, this is a very well named band because he certainly takes what would be considered troublesome debris by most and fashions potently arresting scenes for the synapses out of it.

Now I'm grooving along to the slow burning "Mimesis" and I can help but think of how nice it would be to just quit typing and take another roaming, meandering walk outside with no destination in mind. Then there's the track "Before and After" which transports me to a darkened classroom from decades past, the decrepit desks mutely sit in silence... the blackboard is empty now and listlessly in the still air the papers strewn around this place randomly shuffle like ghosts of what once was; the names and dates smitten, but the chains they do rattle for Mr. Marley do they not .
I could go on and on about what this release sounds like and feels like but you'd be better served to just go out and pick it up. It takes a fair amount of time to warm up to (some of the pieces on here are remarkably demanding and don't go down without a fight) but the view at the zenith is nothing short of bliss.
4
Brutal Resonance

Detritus - Everyday Explanations

8.0
"Great"
N/A
Electroracle
Spotify
Released 2011 by Ad Noiseam
Somewhere along the lines of listening to this, I put it in my portable cd player and wandered outside through the deserted streets of 4am. I looked up and down the avenue lined with trees and watched their branches swaying in the early morning gusts of wind and then this album began to exfoliate my mind. Smooth breaks combined with melodic pianos to reveal all the lost, lonely faces in this city that I have encountered. In a manner similar to Keef Baker's last record, Detritus' new one accentuates it's sometimes skeletal composition through guitar parts that put some muscle into the equation. These aren't the kind of guitars come that with solos and dry ice in the video, they are an added dimension to an already resplendent arsenal of arcane terrain.

So much of 'Everyday Explanations' feels like a celebration of pure isolation, with many of the songs on here possessed of an incredibly reflective character. You think many thoughts while you play this, the yearning to be whole again is one of them. Definitely a late night treat we have on our hands with this one, put it on and let it to be your guide. Have no concerns other than what you're hearing come out of the speakers, it's like floating in the air on a cloud of never ending remembrance. I think what attracts me most to this album is the cinematic nature it contains, at some times I get reminded of the soundtrack to The Silence of the Lambs even though this has no dancing murderer in silk. Whatever you may think of the state of eclectic electronics, this is a very well named band because he certainly takes what would be considered troublesome debris by most and fashions potently arresting scenes for the synapses out of it.

Now I'm grooving along to the slow burning "Mimesis" and I can help but think of how nice it would be to just quit typing and take another roaming, meandering walk outside with no destination in mind. Then there's the track "Before and After" which transports me to a darkened classroom from decades past, the decrepit desks mutely sit in silence... the blackboard is empty now and listlessly in the still air the papers strewn around this place randomly shuffle like ghosts of what once was; the names and dates smitten, but the chains they do rattle for Mr. Marley do they not .
I could go on and on about what this release sounds like and feels like but you'd be better served to just go out and pick it up. It takes a fair amount of time to warm up to (some of the pieces on here are remarkably demanding and don't go down without a fight) but the view at the zenith is nothing short of bliss.
Feb 19 2012

Peter Marks

info@brutalresonance.com
Writer and contributor on Brutal Resonance

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