Deadliner - Wardenclyffe
Industrial, Electronics Nikola Tesla, in my opinion, is one of the most respected and important historical figures to scientists located around the world. He single-handedly transformed the face of modern electronic power and use for years to come. Having memorials built of himself around the world, statues erect, and even placed on the 100 Serbian dinar banknote, it was only time before his legacy was produced through the sound of music.

Deadliner took this task upon himself, quoting that, "Tesla was a genius and deserves a better legacy." While I certainly can agree with the prior statement, I must also admit that Wardenclyffe does a fair job at reconstructing Tesla's life in every fashion. I almost want to rename this album "Nikola Tesla: The Musical, but there would actually have to be a movie and all involved for that to happen. And that would just be silly.

Now, as I said, the album documents Tesla's life all within the span of twenty songs. The tracks aren't all too long most of the time; some just spanning a length of two to three and a half minutes. However, this serves fairly well, as it keeps you on edge. The songs are all instrumental, and the key to a good instrumental album is to also change the beat up. And this is exactly what happens.

Lighter songs mix with heavier ones on this album, with tracks such as The Radiant being beautifully paced and dragging out the synths to make a very sci-fi like tone, keen to the mind of Tesla himself. Other songs such as Cathode have a much more brighter pulse to them, giving a faster pace with a song that just makes your feel as if you're discovering something great.

An oddball from the bunch is a piano solo, titled The Alien Property. While I'm not huge in listening to piano by itself, this was a pretty good song. Not my favorite on the album, as I always prefer the electronics over classical instruments.

On another track we are given the vocal talents of UCNX, giving off some pretty angry speeches. The track itself is a highlight of the album, and is not a track that should be skipped over; this is where two very talented artists get together and collaborate to make something really, really nice.

Now, I've never been all too into history, and no matter how many times I've ever heard of Nikola Tesla, I never really felt the need to look into his life all too much. But, Wardenclyffe has caused me to research into this man's brain a lot, jumping from one section of his life. As much as Tesla invented in his life, there is just so much more to look into. We may never be able to understand the man, nor how his brain actually functioned, but books, movies, and now Deadliner and his latest album can all attempt to describe his life to us. And I think the man behind the music has done a wonderful job in doing so.
4
Brutal Resonance

Deadliner - Wardenclyffe

Nikola Tesla, in my opinion, is one of the most respected and important historical figures to scientists located around the world. He single-handedly transformed the face of modern electronic power and use for years to come. Having memorials built of himself around the world, statues erect, and even placed on the 100 Serbian dinar banknote, it was only time before his legacy was produced through the sound of music.

Deadliner took this task upon himself, quoting that, "Tesla was a genius and deserves a better legacy." While I certainly can agree with the prior statement, I must also admit that Wardenclyffe does a fair job at reconstructing Tesla's life in every fashion. I almost want to rename this album "Nikola Tesla: The Musical, but there would actually have to be a movie and all involved for that to happen. And that would just be silly.

Now, as I said, the album documents Tesla's life all within the span of twenty songs. The tracks aren't all too long most of the time; some just spanning a length of two to three and a half minutes. However, this serves fairly well, as it keeps you on edge. The songs are all instrumental, and the key to a good instrumental album is to also change the beat up. And this is exactly what happens.

Lighter songs mix with heavier ones on this album, with tracks such as The Radiant being beautifully paced and dragging out the synths to make a very sci-fi like tone, keen to the mind of Tesla himself. Other songs such as Cathode have a much more brighter pulse to them, giving a faster pace with a song that just makes your feel as if you're discovering something great.

An oddball from the bunch is a piano solo, titled The Alien Property. While I'm not huge in listening to piano by itself, this was a pretty good song. Not my favorite on the album, as I always prefer the electronics over classical instruments.

On another track we are given the vocal talents of UCNX, giving off some pretty angry speeches. The track itself is a highlight of the album, and is not a track that should be skipped over; this is where two very talented artists get together and collaborate to make something really, really nice.

Now, I've never been all too into history, and no matter how many times I've ever heard of Nikola Tesla, I never really felt the need to look into his life all too much. But, Wardenclyffe has caused me to research into this man's brain a lot, jumping from one section of his life. As much as Tesla invented in his life, there is just so much more to look into. We may never be able to understand the man, nor how his brain actually functioned, but books, movies, and now Deadliner and his latest album can all attempt to describe his life to us. And I think the man behind the music has done a wonderful job in doing so. Jan 13 2014

Steven Gullotta

info@brutalresonance.com
I've been writing for Brutal Resonance since November of 2012 and now serve as the editor-in-chief. I love the dark electronic underground and usually have too much to listen to at once but I love it. I am also an editor at Aggressive Deprivation, a digital/physical magazine since March of 2016. I support the scene as much as I can from my humble laptop.

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Started in spring 2009, Brutal Resonance quickly grew from a Swedish based netzine into an established International zine of the highest standard.

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