Advance - Deus Ex Machina
EBM, Futurepop Scottish based musician Tom Perrett has been putting all he has into his solo music project Advance since her formed it back in 2010. Not taking a break for anyone or anything, he has established himself as a respected musician, supporting very well established acts such as Assemblage 23 and Analog Angel, Back in February, after garnering a bit of a following and proving he's a capable musician, Deus Ex Machina was released via AnalogueTrash, a label that was created out of the fire of electrifying club nights and an overall understanding of the scene.

Picking up this act from their quick reign to supremacy, they teamed up to release their debut release. And here I am to start talking of it. Weapon of Choice hits off the album with a fierce tone, and a faster pace with a nice lyrical consent to give off more than just your standard dance hit. Well done, and a good way to get the audience sucked into your album.

Fractured Existence brings forth a steady EBM bassline, jumping up in pace and slapped with a background synth that endures throughout most of the song. It sort of follows on the solemn tone set by the previous track, though it is brighter in texture. The Road seems to follow in the more serious accent, breaking out a beat that's not as club friendly, but still pounds out a solid course of technological advancements.

With a theatrical opening featuring a luminous thunderstorm followed by a bleak synth line, Enter The Wastelands keeps up this grim feel. The vocals work up a wonderful appetite, perfectly matching the mournful tone of the song. Well done, and moves in another new territory.

Dead Technology throws out the EBM influences and strays into a trance-dance territory, continuing forth the wonderful romp I've been caught in. Synths dominate the song and give off a wonderful glowing feel to expand upon the already established theme.

New Objective gives off a steady drop of bass as the rhythm unfolds, the lyrical content and beat showing off a more politically inspired song based around military conflicts. If your looking for a song with deep meaning, you'll do no better then listening to this track outright.

Cracking out a less heavy, more futuristic in style track, Diving Machines provides a sample ridden, but fun instrumental that is able to run for near seven minutes and never dull a moment.

Break The Silence is able to do just what the title states; slender and intelligent dance tunes form through a ricocheting electronic beat boosted by the synthetic riffs that pound out a wonderful beat. The vocals slide along just as easily with them, not backing off for an instant, nor overpowering the music that they accompany.

The final track on the album When We Return was slower moving, but had a deep synth flowing in the background that did not halt. It gave the song a much more spiritual presence, if you could call it that.

And, finally, after all is said and done, this guy knows what he's doing, and it's no shock to me that he's been climbing the ranks, getting his name out there and appearing side-by-side with well established acts. His songs move from one beat to the next without flinching, and he can crank out longer tunes that don't escape my ears attention because they are riveting. A well deserved score to a well deserved band; check this guy out. He'll do you nicely.
4
Brutal Resonance

Advance - Deus Ex Machina

8.0
"Great"
N/A
Electroracle
Spotify
Released 2014 by AnalogueTrash
Scottish based musician Tom Perrett has been putting all he has into his solo music project Advance since her formed it back in 2010. Not taking a break for anyone or anything, he has established himself as a respected musician, supporting very well established acts such as Assemblage 23 and Analog Angel, Back in February, after garnering a bit of a following and proving he's a capable musician, Deus Ex Machina was released via AnalogueTrash, a label that was created out of the fire of electrifying club nights and an overall understanding of the scene.

Picking up this act from their quick reign to supremacy, they teamed up to release their debut release. And here I am to start talking of it. Weapon of Choice hits off the album with a fierce tone, and a faster pace with a nice lyrical consent to give off more than just your standard dance hit. Well done, and a good way to get the audience sucked into your album.

Fractured Existence brings forth a steady EBM bassline, jumping up in pace and slapped with a background synth that endures throughout most of the song. It sort of follows on the solemn tone set by the previous track, though it is brighter in texture. The Road seems to follow in the more serious accent, breaking out a beat that's not as club friendly, but still pounds out a solid course of technological advancements.

With a theatrical opening featuring a luminous thunderstorm followed by a bleak synth line, Enter The Wastelands keeps up this grim feel. The vocals work up a wonderful appetite, perfectly matching the mournful tone of the song. Well done, and moves in another new territory.

Dead Technology throws out the EBM influences and strays into a trance-dance territory, continuing forth the wonderful romp I've been caught in. Synths dominate the song and give off a wonderful glowing feel to expand upon the already established theme.

New Objective gives off a steady drop of bass as the rhythm unfolds, the lyrical content and beat showing off a more politically inspired song based around military conflicts. If your looking for a song with deep meaning, you'll do no better then listening to this track outright.

Cracking out a less heavy, more futuristic in style track, Diving Machines provides a sample ridden, but fun instrumental that is able to run for near seven minutes and never dull a moment.

Break The Silence is able to do just what the title states; slender and intelligent dance tunes form through a ricocheting electronic beat boosted by the synthetic riffs that pound out a wonderful beat. The vocals slide along just as easily with them, not backing off for an instant, nor overpowering the music that they accompany.

The final track on the album When We Return was slower moving, but had a deep synth flowing in the background that did not halt. It gave the song a much more spiritual presence, if you could call it that.

And, finally, after all is said and done, this guy knows what he's doing, and it's no shock to me that he's been climbing the ranks, getting his name out there and appearing side-by-side with well established acts. His songs move from one beat to the next without flinching, and he can crank out longer tunes that don't escape my ears attention because they are riveting. A well deserved score to a well deserved band; check this guy out. He'll do you nicely. Aug 07 2014

Steven Gullotta

info@brutalresonance.com
I've been writing for Brutal Resonance since November of 2012 and now serve as the editor-in-chief. I love the dark electronic underground and usually have too much to listen to at once but I love it. I am also an editor at Aggressive Deprivation, a digital/physical magazine since March of 2016. I support the scene as much as I can from my humble laptop.

Share this review

Facebook
Twitter
Google+
13
Shares

Related articles

Advance

Interview, Jun 01 2016

Unitary - 'Safe From Harm'

Review, Aug 24 2011

And One - 'S.T.O.P.'

Review, Sep 05 2012

Neotek

Interview, Dec 01 2009

Shortly about us

Started in spring 2009, Brutal Resonance quickly grew from a Swedish based netzine into an established International zine of the highest standard.

We cover genres like Synthpop, EBM, Industrial, Dark Ambient, Neofolk, Darkwave, Noise and all their sub- and similar genres.

© Brutal Resonance 2009-2016
Designed by and developed by Head of Mímir 2016