Acclimate V.1 - Noise Pigs
Experimental, Industrial Originally started back many years ago, Acclimate V.1 is the epic brain child brought forth from experiment electronic artist and industrial music producer Artemisl however, he is not alone in this new version, as he's been reunited with PBK, a veteran ambient artist in the field (they added the V.1 to the end of Acclimate in this iteration to distinguish this act from Artemis' solo works). And, what I think matter most when it comes to this project is this little line that I read in his biography: "There is neither rhyme nor reason to when his next release will be issued. This is a hobby. He does this for fun." I think the reason that stuck out to me so much is more or less because a lot of musicians seek to release multiple releases, singles, or EPs within short time periods, in which they forget the main reason why they started making music in the first place: to create something enjoyable and fun, However, rather than praising the artist for his steadfast approach in releasing music, I am here to judge the 2013 release, Noise Pigs.

And, no, when I say noise pigs I am not referring to a bunch of pigs squealing and going, "Oink, oink," as old farmer John comes along ready to slaughter them for profit. No, I am talking about fourteen tracks of experimental noise and industrial sounds with a nice little under-layer of ambient works. Including a remix from Attrition. As well as vocals from Martin Bowes (he's behind Attrition), Hakan Paulsson of Sanctum and Azure Skies, and Katrin Radman formerly of Coptic Rain.

And, well, Noise Pigs is as good a title for this release as any. With what sounds like rusted metal chains making a high squeak as they swing back and forth, metallic thumps hinder in, when a very friendly voice bellows, "Hello, hello, hello, we are glad you could make the journey to join us!" And it's at this point that you're probably wondering if you're glad you came along this journey as well. But, but this time, it's too late for that. A train's steamrolling horn goes off, and then we're introduced to an electronically seductive beat that has that extra layer of texture added to it with the ambient fed line underneath it all. The sound of a knife coming out of its sheath and making a nice little swish noise, thin metal falling and hitting the floor, as well as later wonderous synth work made this introductory track a huge ADD ridden assault that was a pleaure to get through. Marvelous.

A steady build up of static with electronic tidbits let Always These Nightmares safely come into the play. Xylophone hits in, creating that exact nightmarish fuel to drive forward; you'd probably look behind yourself waiting to see a creepy possessed little doll or Krueger himself. The sound gets louder near the end, and eventually ending off with a very creepily spoken line, "You like the music? I like the music very much. Would you like to dance? Just you and me. But first...".

And, after we're left off wondering what that final, possibly threatening line could lead off into, we're fed Wavelength. Which isn't as ill-omened as the final line of the previous song led me on to believe. Lots of experimental noise is to be found here, and in order for me to describe it, I would most likely need to call to robots found in sci-fi movies. However, my favorite part of the song came later on, near around the two and a half minute mark, where a rhythmic noise section appeared out of nowhere. Well done, as a few more experimental noises fulfilled a few gapes here and there, and serves there purpose well.

Coming onto track number four, Drifting, a very tribal-esque, dragged out chord was sung. Glitch flavored noises played out well enough, the echoing ambient works in the background sounding out very well. Sometimes, the sung out voice sounded very pained, almost as if there was some sort of sacrifice going on, but, hey, whatever floats your boat.

The Violent Void came off as anything but violent sounding. There was a lot of drone. A lot of underwater sounding effects, and near the two and a half minute mark, there was some pretty heavy sounding drums and noise combined. Perhaps that's where the violent part of the song lurked. But, still, it was very nice.

Cry Of The Noise Pigs came on next, and within seconds, I could hear the crying of the noise pigs. It literally sounded like a cybernetic farm filled with mechanically gauged animals all bound up with wires and tubes. Anybody who is a fan of something that won't fuck your ears should stay away from this song, as it will chew them up and spit them right back out. Beware. I warned you.

Coming off the ear fuck, we're slightly given an apology with what sounds like some violin work in the beginning of Hush. However, that lasts only for a bit before we're fed some more noise with lots of noise in between. A heavy dose of drum work is introduced in the song, and later, what sounds like lots of gunfire in a distorted essence bangs out. Again, those who appreciate their ears and hearing should stray away from this track.

Trip was absolutely promising when it came to the opening line that stated, "Make all the noise you fucking want." I absolutely hated the high pitched squeals that came along with it, but really appreciated the slower sections that just allowed you to chill out and relax for a bit. And, in keeping up with the noise aspect of things, Biological Imperative allowed for another whole hearted effort to just create more noise to enjoy.

Although Napolean Schemes, Snowball Flees focused on dirtier, grimier noise, there was a beautiful section complete with synth works and piano flavorings near the end of the song. Eventually it cut out, sort of glitching, and just faded into silence, where the song left off.

Retrogram added in some more heavier atmospheric noises, a few decent effects here and there, a bit of a rhythm floating around later on; overall, not a bad song. The later louder synth works mixed with more of the electronics made it all the better, and made me want to keep going through the song.

The Attrition remix, titled Re-Trip was all fun and clean, but wasn't nearly as catchy as the rest of the album. Heavier in its drum line and delivery however, but still not as catchy. While Nothing To Mend added a bit of flair with some decent vocal work, Born Of Ancient Longing delivered on that twicefold with a bit of a story added to it. And then the song ended with a bit of a tribal attitude to it.

And, that would happen to be the end of the album. Two skilled music producers came together to deliver a experimental noise and ambient hybrid, and they delivered just on that promise. Sometimes the noise came out a little too rugged, a little too all over the place and hurting to the ears to really enjoy, but it was still something I could get through without many complaints. If you're open minded enough, go ahead and check this album out. It's pretty damned good.
4
Brutal Resonance

Acclimate V.1 - Noise Pigs

Originally started back many years ago, Acclimate V.1 is the epic brain child brought forth from experiment electronic artist and industrial music producer Artemisl however, he is not alone in this new version, as he's been reunited with PBK, a veteran ambient artist in the field (they added the V.1 to the end of Acclimate in this iteration to distinguish this act from Artemis' solo works). And, what I think matter most when it comes to this project is this little line that I read in his biography: "There is neither rhyme nor reason to when his next release will be issued. This is a hobby. He does this for fun." I think the reason that stuck out to me so much is more or less because a lot of musicians seek to release multiple releases, singles, or EPs within short time periods, in which they forget the main reason why they started making music in the first place: to create something enjoyable and fun, However, rather than praising the artist for his steadfast approach in releasing music, I am here to judge the 2013 release, Noise Pigs.

And, no, when I say noise pigs I am not referring to a bunch of pigs squealing and going, "Oink, oink," as old farmer John comes along ready to slaughter them for profit. No, I am talking about fourteen tracks of experimental noise and industrial sounds with a nice little under-layer of ambient works. Including a remix from Attrition. As well as vocals from Martin Bowes (he's behind Attrition), Hakan Paulsson of Sanctum and Azure Skies, and Katrin Radman formerly of Coptic Rain.

And, well, Noise Pigs is as good a title for this release as any. With what sounds like rusted metal chains making a high squeak as they swing back and forth, metallic thumps hinder in, when a very friendly voice bellows, "Hello, hello, hello, we are glad you could make the journey to join us!" And it's at this point that you're probably wondering if you're glad you came along this journey as well. But, but this time, it's too late for that. A train's steamrolling horn goes off, and then we're introduced to an electronically seductive beat that has that extra layer of texture added to it with the ambient fed line underneath it all. The sound of a knife coming out of its sheath and making a nice little swish noise, thin metal falling and hitting the floor, as well as later wonderous synth work made this introductory track a huge ADD ridden assault that was a pleaure to get through. Marvelous.

A steady build up of static with electronic tidbits let Always These Nightmares safely come into the play. Xylophone hits in, creating that exact nightmarish fuel to drive forward; you'd probably look behind yourself waiting to see a creepy possessed little doll or Krueger himself. The sound gets louder near the end, and eventually ending off with a very creepily spoken line, "You like the music? I like the music very much. Would you like to dance? Just you and me. But first...".

And, after we're left off wondering what that final, possibly threatening line could lead off into, we're fed Wavelength. Which isn't as ill-omened as the final line of the previous song led me on to believe. Lots of experimental noise is to be found here, and in order for me to describe it, I would most likely need to call to robots found in sci-fi movies. However, my favorite part of the song came later on, near around the two and a half minute mark, where a rhythmic noise section appeared out of nowhere. Well done, as a few more experimental noises fulfilled a few gapes here and there, and serves there purpose well.

Coming onto track number four, Drifting, a very tribal-esque, dragged out chord was sung. Glitch flavored noises played out well enough, the echoing ambient works in the background sounding out very well. Sometimes, the sung out voice sounded very pained, almost as if there was some sort of sacrifice going on, but, hey, whatever floats your boat.

The Violent Void came off as anything but violent sounding. There was a lot of drone. A lot of underwater sounding effects, and near the two and a half minute mark, there was some pretty heavy sounding drums and noise combined. Perhaps that's where the violent part of the song lurked. But, still, it was very nice.

Cry Of The Noise Pigs came on next, and within seconds, I could hear the crying of the noise pigs. It literally sounded like a cybernetic farm filled with mechanically gauged animals all bound up with wires and tubes. Anybody who is a fan of something that won't fuck your ears should stay away from this song, as it will chew them up and spit them right back out. Beware. I warned you.

Coming off the ear fuck, we're slightly given an apology with what sounds like some violin work in the beginning of Hush. However, that lasts only for a bit before we're fed some more noise with lots of noise in between. A heavy dose of drum work is introduced in the song, and later, what sounds like lots of gunfire in a distorted essence bangs out. Again, those who appreciate their ears and hearing should stray away from this track.

Trip was absolutely promising when it came to the opening line that stated, "Make all the noise you fucking want." I absolutely hated the high pitched squeals that came along with it, but really appreciated the slower sections that just allowed you to chill out and relax for a bit. And, in keeping up with the noise aspect of things, Biological Imperative allowed for another whole hearted effort to just create more noise to enjoy.

Although Napolean Schemes, Snowball Flees focused on dirtier, grimier noise, there was a beautiful section complete with synth works and piano flavorings near the end of the song. Eventually it cut out, sort of glitching, and just faded into silence, where the song left off.

Retrogram added in some more heavier atmospheric noises, a few decent effects here and there, a bit of a rhythm floating around later on; overall, not a bad song. The later louder synth works mixed with more of the electronics made it all the better, and made me want to keep going through the song.

The Attrition remix, titled Re-Trip was all fun and clean, but wasn't nearly as catchy as the rest of the album. Heavier in its drum line and delivery however, but still not as catchy. While Nothing To Mend added a bit of flair with some decent vocal work, Born Of Ancient Longing delivered on that twicefold with a bit of a story added to it. And then the song ended with a bit of a tribal attitude to it.

And, that would happen to be the end of the album. Two skilled music producers came together to deliver a experimental noise and ambient hybrid, and they delivered just on that promise. Sometimes the noise came out a little too rugged, a little too all over the place and hurting to the ears to really enjoy, but it was still something I could get through without many complaints. If you're open minded enough, go ahead and check this album out. It's pretty damned good.
Sep 23 2014

Steven Gullotta

info@brutalresonance.com
I've been writing for Brutal Resonance since November of 2012 and now serve as the editor-in-chief. I love the dark electronic underground and usually have too much to listen to at once but I love it. I am also an editor at Aggressive Deprivation, a digital/physical magazine since March of 2016. I support the scene as much as I can from my humble laptop.

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