St Lucifer has plenty to say down below so I'll try and make this little prologue quick. The band's most recent outing is "Music is Violence" via AnalogueTrash records and that's what we speak of today amongst many other subjects. So, sit back, relax, hit the play button, and find out more about this lovely group of individuals:


Hello St. Lucifer and welcome to Brutal Resonance. This should be fun considering this is the first time we’ll be interviewing you. I would like to take the time to explore a bit of the project’s history and talk about your latest album. But first, let’s start with the basics. Who is in the band and what do they do, what’s your favorite album of all time, and what’s your favorite dessert?
 
St. Lucifer: Quick roll call: St Lucifer are David (Vocals/Guitar/Synths), Charlotte (Lead Guitar/Vocals), John (Bass/Tech) and Alice (Drums/Vocals). Our favourite albums of all time are wildly different (and change constantly depending on our various moods) but the current ‘position’ is: David, a coin flip between ‘Music Has The Right to Children’ by Boards of Canada and ‘Spirit of Eden’ by Talk Talk; Charlotte says ‘The Holy Bible’ by The Manic Street Preachers or possibly ‘Somewhere In Time’ by Iron Maiden,; John says Menthol's ‘Danger: Rock Science!’ while Alice picks ‘Energy’ by Operation Ivy.

Dessert wise it’s Lemon Cheesecake (David), Chocolate Fudge Cake (Alice), Black Forest Gateaux (John), and Banoffee Pie with Ice Cream on top (Lottie). We think it’s fair to say we’re quite an eclectic bunch!

You’ve got a full line-up between the four of you. Was St. Lucifer always a four-person project? Or did it start with fewer members at first and steadily build? While we’re at it, how did each of you wind up meeting one another?
 
St. Lucifer: Well, David and John have run Valentine Records since 2001 and have co-produced a number of records by different acts over the years. St Lucifer initially came about because David wanted to perform some material he’d written in collaboration with original vocalist Alex Lee (of Oberloytnant/Ultravinyls) and John was the obvious choice for a ‘do you want to come and play bass for this gig we’re doing?’’ inquiry. Said gig took place in October 2015 and the young chap who put it on (the sartorially immaculate Charlie Bergmann) was so impressed that he offered his services as drummer as soon as we left the stage.  A year of crazy UK-wide gigs followed while we released a series of sold-out 7” singles on the aforementioned Valentine Records culminating in our debut self titled album in December 2016. 

2017 saw some big changes for the band (both professionally and personally) including the writing/demo stage of our second LP, a full UK tour and signing to Analogue Trash records (juggling parenthood, a band, day-jobs and ‘running the label the band was signed to’ was becoming one plate too many for John and David to spin). The aformentioned tour then ended with the amicable departure of Mr. Bergmann The poor chap had his finals coming up and really needed to knuckle down to ensure he passed his exams. 

On the plus side we’d managed to ‘acquire’ former Action-Directe/Syd.31 guitarist Charlotte Winchcombe who rapidly expanded the sound with her trademark pyrotechnic guitar sound. The album itself "Music Is Violence" was then recorded during an increasingly ‘challenging’ period for the band - which was further complicated by Alex’s relocation to the Isle a Wight around two-thirds of the way through the recording process. After much soul-searching and ambitious plans to maintain the line-up, we ultimately realised that the sheer distance was going to impede the band progressing so we agreed another ‘conscious uncoupling’ (this time with Alex) and emerged from the studio a rather different band to the one that went in.

As the mastering/sleeve design/record label ‘stuff’ was worked through in the early part of 2018 we were extremely fortunate to then stumble over the ‘missing piece’ of the St Lucifer MK 2 jigsaw in the shape of drummer/backing vocalist Alice Class. Two gigs in and it was obvious we’d made the right choice with both the new line-up and deciding to continue as a band. Which was something of a relief!


You’ve got a lot of musical influences going on with the project. Not only from what I’ve heard on your latest album, but also from what’s listed on Facebook: industrial, post-punk, electronic, anti-pop, and noise. How do you manage to find a sound balance between all these aspects?

St. Lucifer: As you can see above we all have a wide range of influences - we’re all hopeless music addicts and have been hoovering up records (both physical and digital) as long as any of us can remember. Having said this, the first LP was arguably more ‘straight ahead’ electro-punk/pop, whereas "Music Is Violence" takes in a far wider range of influences and directions. Either way, we’d like to think that our sound is unique, yet also capable of covering a range of ground (compare the slick synth-pop of ‘Crucible’ with the drone rock of ‘Gone’ or the blastbeat ‘shoutiness’ of ‘No New Gods’). Ultimately we want to be both entertained and entertaining. 

You’ve signed with AnalogueTrash Records in 2016 – smart and lovely folks over there – and have released your newest album “Music is Violence” on the label. Tell me, what is this album about? Is there an overall theme or individual messages per song?

St. Lucifer: Ironically, the title track is the least indicative of the album in terms of lyrical content. "Music Is Violence" is an outward looking rant at the twin ills of Brexit and Trump’s toxic brand of post-truth politics while the remainder of the LP is very much a personal confessional record: covering everything from addiction to anorexia, drug abuse to clinical depression and the protracted/painful breakdown of several romantic relationships.

Some of the tracks link together such as ‘All Lines Lead Forward’ and ‘Raise The Dead’ being bookends to one such relationship while the titular ‘Vermin’ is actually directed back at the author, not some nefarious third party. The three guest vocalists (poets Neo_101 and Emily Oldfield and Still Forever’s Amy Griffiths) all contribute pitch-perfect subject matter which slot perfectly into the albums wider themes of self-harm, trauma and (ultimately) redemption
 
The cover art is quite striking; it certainly sticks out in the sea of album covers I have on my PC. Who designed the cover art and what does it represent?
 
St. Lucifer: The initial concept/brief came from David which was something along the lines of ‘early Suede meets V for Vendetta meets Banksy’s kissing policemen’. We also did a mood board on Pinterest which the whole band contributed to and helped establish the striking BLACK/RED/WHITE colour scheme. We then handed the execution over to the label’s regular artist/designer Jack Leeson (Jack of Arts) who we think it’s fair to say ‘nailed it’ in terms of meeting the original brief.


There are fourteen songs on the album and I highly doubt that it was a cake walk to make all of those. Take us through the production of one of your songs. Does is start with a musical note or does it build up in your head first? And how hard is it to transition that idea or note into one full song?
 
St. Lucifer: To be honest, there’s not really a ‘default’ path to creating a St Lucifer track. As with the first LP, many of the ‘Alex-in-the-band’ tracks were road-tested live before recording (No New Gods, Forward etc) whereas the ‘post-Alex’ tracks were much more studio creations born of the necessity of the circumstances in which they were made. ‘Six Bathyspheres’ and ‘Relapse’ are both good examples of this - neither would have come about by ‘jamming in a room’ before a gig. By reinventing the line-up we’ve also been able to try new methods of putting songs together.  ‘Dark Matter’ is largely a Charlotte song, whereas the lead guitar line on the verses is actually David. The music for ‘All Lines’ was written by John years ago and reworked while ‘Relapse’ is John’s lyrics and David’s music.
 
Do you find yourselves writing lyrics for the songs before or after the music is made? And would you consider writing the lyrics tougher than making the music?
 
St. Lucifer: We tend to add lyrics after the music but, again, there are exceptions that prove the rule. The collaborations with Emily were (naturally) the other way around - given that she’s a poet - so it made sense for the music to respond to her. David often takes the ‘Paul McCartney’ approach of pitching a melody with nonsense lyrics (la la la/Ham and Eggs’) before writing words that fit the melody. Charlotte tends to write lyrics before ‘vocalising them’ - who knows what Alice will come up with!

Out of all the songs on “Music Violence”, which is your favorite and why?
 
St. Lucifer: Very hard choice. To be honest, we all enjoy them all for different reasons.  Some are more fun to play live. 'Bathyspheres' has strangely become a bit of a live favourite despite it having been written and recorded entirely in the studio. Another point is that (despite its 14 track length) the album is very much designed to flow quickly and tightly as a suite of songs. We actually performed it (very nearly) in the same order as the record at the ‘official’ launch party in December and, despite being a rather punishing physical workout we all felt the sequencing of the songs felt ‘right’ in the context
 
What are you guys currently working on? Any new songs, EPs, remixes, etc? Do you have any tours or live shows coming up?
 
St. Lucifer: Well, there’s a new EP coming out to coincide with the next run of tour dates (just announced/see our website/local press for details etc) which comprises a new version of ‘Music Is Violence’ (with the current line-up), a fantastic remix of ‘The Enemy’ by Still Forever and a couple of brand new tracks which might give a taste of where we’re going next. We’re then concentrating on touring the current record whilst taking a relaxed approach to exploring ideas for ‘album #3’ in our lovely new riverside studio (which we moved into over Christmas).
 
Lastly, I would like to thank you for your time. I leave the space below open for you to cover anything I may not have mentioned above or any final words. Cheers!

St. Lucifer: Thank you for the opportunity to chat, always a pleasure! Not much else to say other than look out for a couple of very special collaborations during 2019. We can’t say much more just yet (sworn to secrecy and all that) but let’s just say you haven’t heard the last of us this year. 
St. Lucifer interview
March 3, 2019
Brutal Resonance

St. Lucifer

Mar 2019
St Lucifer has plenty to say down below so I'll try and make this little prologue quick. The band's most recent outing is "Music is Violence" via AnalogueTrash records and that's what we speak of today amongst many other subjects. So, sit back, relax, hit the play button, and find out more about this lovely group of individuals:


Hello St. Lucifer and welcome to Brutal Resonance. This should be fun considering this is the first time we’ll be interviewing you. I would like to take the time to explore a bit of the project’s history and talk about your latest album. But first, let’s start with the basics. Who is in the band and what do they do, what’s your favorite album of all time, and what’s your favorite dessert?
 
St. Lucifer: Quick roll call: St Lucifer are David (Vocals/Guitar/Synths), Charlotte (Lead Guitar/Vocals), John (Bass/Tech) and Alice (Drums/Vocals). Our favourite albums of all time are wildly different (and change constantly depending on our various moods) but the current ‘position’ is: David, a coin flip between ‘Music Has The Right to Children’ by Boards of Canada and ‘Spirit of Eden’ by Talk Talk; Charlotte says ‘The Holy Bible’ by The Manic Street Preachers or possibly ‘Somewhere In Time’ by Iron Maiden,; John says Menthol's ‘Danger: Rock Science!’ while Alice picks ‘Energy’ by Operation Ivy.

Dessert wise it’s Lemon Cheesecake (David), Chocolate Fudge Cake (Alice), Black Forest Gateaux (John), and Banoffee Pie with Ice Cream on top (Lottie). We think it’s fair to say we’re quite an eclectic bunch!

You’ve got a full line-up between the four of you. Was St. Lucifer always a four-person project? Or did it start with fewer members at first and steadily build? While we’re at it, how did each of you wind up meeting one another?
 
St. Lucifer: Well, David and John have run Valentine Records since 2001 and have co-produced a number of records by different acts over the years. St Lucifer initially came about because David wanted to perform some material he’d written in collaboration with original vocalist Alex Lee (of Oberloytnant/Ultravinyls) and John was the obvious choice for a ‘do you want to come and play bass for this gig we’re doing?’’ inquiry. Said gig took place in October 2015 and the young chap who put it on (the sartorially immaculate Charlie Bergmann) was so impressed that he offered his services as drummer as soon as we left the stage.  A year of crazy UK-wide gigs followed while we released a series of sold-out 7” singles on the aforementioned Valentine Records culminating in our debut self titled album in December 2016. 

2017 saw some big changes for the band (both professionally and personally) including the writing/demo stage of our second LP, a full UK tour and signing to Analogue Trash records (juggling parenthood, a band, day-jobs and ‘running the label the band was signed to’ was becoming one plate too many for John and David to spin). The aformentioned tour then ended with the amicable departure of Mr. Bergmann The poor chap had his finals coming up and really needed to knuckle down to ensure he passed his exams. 

On the plus side we’d managed to ‘acquire’ former Action-Directe/Syd.31 guitarist Charlotte Winchcombe who rapidly expanded the sound with her trademark pyrotechnic guitar sound. The album itself "Music Is Violence" was then recorded during an increasingly ‘challenging’ period for the band - which was further complicated by Alex’s relocation to the Isle a Wight around two-thirds of the way through the recording process. After much soul-searching and ambitious plans to maintain the line-up, we ultimately realised that the sheer distance was going to impede the band progressing so we agreed another ‘conscious uncoupling’ (this time with Alex) and emerged from the studio a rather different band to the one that went in.

As the mastering/sleeve design/record label ‘stuff’ was worked through in the early part of 2018 we were extremely fortunate to then stumble over the ‘missing piece’ of the St Lucifer MK 2 jigsaw in the shape of drummer/backing vocalist Alice Class. Two gigs in and it was obvious we’d made the right choice with both the new line-up and deciding to continue as a band. Which was something of a relief!


You’ve got a lot of musical influences going on with the project. Not only from what I’ve heard on your latest album, but also from what’s listed on Facebook: industrial, post-punk, electronic, anti-pop, and noise. How do you manage to find a sound balance between all these aspects?

St. Lucifer: As you can see above we all have a wide range of influences - we’re all hopeless music addicts and have been hoovering up records (both physical and digital) as long as any of us can remember. Having said this, the first LP was arguably more ‘straight ahead’ electro-punk/pop, whereas "Music Is Violence" takes in a far wider range of influences and directions. Either way, we’d like to think that our sound is unique, yet also capable of covering a range of ground (compare the slick synth-pop of ‘Crucible’ with the drone rock of ‘Gone’ or the blastbeat ‘shoutiness’ of ‘No New Gods’). Ultimately we want to be both entertained and entertaining. 

You’ve signed with AnalogueTrash Records in 2016 – smart and lovely folks over there – and have released your newest album “Music is Violence” on the label. Tell me, what is this album about? Is there an overall theme or individual messages per song?

St. Lucifer: Ironically, the title track is the least indicative of the album in terms of lyrical content. "Music Is Violence" is an outward looking rant at the twin ills of Brexit and Trump’s toxic brand of post-truth politics while the remainder of the LP is very much a personal confessional record: covering everything from addiction to anorexia, drug abuse to clinical depression and the protracted/painful breakdown of several romantic relationships.

Some of the tracks link together such as ‘All Lines Lead Forward’ and ‘Raise The Dead’ being bookends to one such relationship while the titular ‘Vermin’ is actually directed back at the author, not some nefarious third party. The three guest vocalists (poets Neo_101 and Emily Oldfield and Still Forever’s Amy Griffiths) all contribute pitch-perfect subject matter which slot perfectly into the albums wider themes of self-harm, trauma and (ultimately) redemption
 
The cover art is quite striking; it certainly sticks out in the sea of album covers I have on my PC. Who designed the cover art and what does it represent?
 
St. Lucifer: The initial concept/brief came from David which was something along the lines of ‘early Suede meets V for Vendetta meets Banksy’s kissing policemen’. We also did a mood board on Pinterest which the whole band contributed to and helped establish the striking BLACK/RED/WHITE colour scheme. We then handed the execution over to the label’s regular artist/designer Jack Leeson (Jack of Arts) who we think it’s fair to say ‘nailed it’ in terms of meeting the original brief.


There are fourteen songs on the album and I highly doubt that it was a cake walk to make all of those. Take us through the production of one of your songs. Does is start with a musical note or does it build up in your head first? And how hard is it to transition that idea or note into one full song?
 
St. Lucifer: To be honest, there’s not really a ‘default’ path to creating a St Lucifer track. As with the first LP, many of the ‘Alex-in-the-band’ tracks were road-tested live before recording (No New Gods, Forward etc) whereas the ‘post-Alex’ tracks were much more studio creations born of the necessity of the circumstances in which they were made. ‘Six Bathyspheres’ and ‘Relapse’ are both good examples of this - neither would have come about by ‘jamming in a room’ before a gig. By reinventing the line-up we’ve also been able to try new methods of putting songs together.  ‘Dark Matter’ is largely a Charlotte song, whereas the lead guitar line on the verses is actually David. The music for ‘All Lines’ was written by John years ago and reworked while ‘Relapse’ is John’s lyrics and David’s music.
 
Do you find yourselves writing lyrics for the songs before or after the music is made? And would you consider writing the lyrics tougher than making the music?
 
St. Lucifer: We tend to add lyrics after the music but, again, there are exceptions that prove the rule. The collaborations with Emily were (naturally) the other way around - given that she’s a poet - so it made sense for the music to respond to her. David often takes the ‘Paul McCartney’ approach of pitching a melody with nonsense lyrics (la la la/Ham and Eggs’) before writing words that fit the melody. Charlotte tends to write lyrics before ‘vocalising them’ - who knows what Alice will come up with!

Out of all the songs on “Music Violence”, which is your favorite and why?
 
St. Lucifer: Very hard choice. To be honest, we all enjoy them all for different reasons.  Some are more fun to play live. 'Bathyspheres' has strangely become a bit of a live favourite despite it having been written and recorded entirely in the studio. Another point is that (despite its 14 track length) the album is very much designed to flow quickly and tightly as a suite of songs. We actually performed it (very nearly) in the same order as the record at the ‘official’ launch party in December and, despite being a rather punishing physical workout we all felt the sequencing of the songs felt ‘right’ in the context
 
What are you guys currently working on? Any new songs, EPs, remixes, etc? Do you have any tours or live shows coming up?
 
St. Lucifer: Well, there’s a new EP coming out to coincide with the next run of tour dates (just announced/see our website/local press for details etc) which comprises a new version of ‘Music Is Violence’ (with the current line-up), a fantastic remix of ‘The Enemy’ by Still Forever and a couple of brand new tracks which might give a taste of where we’re going next. We’re then concentrating on touring the current record whilst taking a relaxed approach to exploring ideas for ‘album #3’ in our lovely new riverside studio (which we moved into over Christmas).
 
Lastly, I would like to thank you for your time. I leave the space below open for you to cover anything I may not have mentioned above or any final words. Cheers!

St. Lucifer: Thank you for the opportunity to chat, always a pleasure! Not much else to say other than look out for a couple of very special collaborations during 2019. We can’t say much more just yet (sworn to secrecy and all that) but let’s just say you haven’t heard the last of us this year. 
Mar 03 2019

Steven Gullotta

info@brutalresonance.com
I've been writing for Brutal Resonance since November of 2012 and now serve as the editor-in-chief. I love the dark electronic underground and usually have too much to listen to at once but I love it. I am also an editor at Aggressive Deprivation, a digital/physical magazine since March of 2016. I support the scene as much as I can from my humble laptop.

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