Slashgore, though a relatively new face in the Russian industrial/electronic scene, has been putting out their music with all they have since 2014 with the release of their demo Possession. Collecting a pool of fans following the release of their initial demo, 2015 saw the release of their debut album Regeneration. And, now, I have spoken to Russia's own NuGothElectro masters, Slashgore. Read on below to find out a little bit about their history, influences, and much more! 


What's the history of Slashgore?

Kirill:  It’s been a long time since 2008. This was when I first started playing music, and after playing in a few bands, I created Slashgore. In this band I’m using my past experiences in music, and I’m still learning new things everyday. I've played in different genres from metalcore to dark electro, but now I have no boundaries, I’m mixing anything I like.

What genre of music do you consider Slashgore to be?
Kirill:  I’m mixing the genres that I like and I’m calling it NuGothElectro. For example, I took “Nu” from NuMetal, “Goth” because my music is dark, and electro because it’s electronic.

What's the inspiration behind your work?
Kirill:  In general I’m writing about my true past experiences and the feelings they evoke in me. But sometimes I write about things I like, such as movies (Night of the Demons, The Return of the Living Dead) and historical figures (President John F. Kennedy). All my songs have meaning or a message, and I hate hearing songs that are senseless and about nothing. It’s important to me to write this way for my listeners.

If you could work with any three people who would they be?
Kirill:  First, it’s Corey Taylor (Slipknot)

Next, Peter Murphy (Would be cool -old school and new school, you know?)

And I want to work with the American band, Earshot.

What can you tell me about your instruments? (i.e., Are you subject to brand loyalty or will you play with whatever is available? What made you choose the instruments you have now? Was it cost or was it a style/model/brand/colour preference?
Kirill:  I’m using the cheapest keyboard, I don’t even remember what brand it is, because I painted it black. It works well for me still, so I don’t need anything new. I’m changing only microphones, right now I’m using an AKG.


Tell us a joke.
Kirill:  I’m Russian, we don’t joke around.

Honestly, I have some fun stories from my shows and shooting my videos, but I can't remember them right now. Maybe next time.

So who would you say is your greatest musical influence and why?
Kirill:  It’s the band Slipknot. When I was a kid, I saw their music video and it completely amazed me. I realized I wanted to be involved with this kind of music.

Could you briefly describe the music-making process?
Kirill:  I can’t write without inspiration. I can’t just sit down and start writing. I can’t even sing if I’m not in the right mood. But luckily my muse doesn’t leave for too long. I like to write when I’m alone. When I get an idea for a song, first I write the music, and then I write my lyrics and melody.

What are your rehearsals generally like? Do you have a set time each week in which you practice or are rehearsals more spontaneous?
Kirill:  I’m practising more when I have a concert coming up. Otherwise, I’m practising when I’m writing something new.

What do you see as a musician's role in society?
Kirill:  I know my role in society, people write to me telling me that my music has helped them when they have felt depressed and alone, and they knew that someone else in this world understands how they feel.

I’m the voice of a disappointed generation and I’m glad to help them, emotionally.

If you could change one thing about the music industry, what would it be?
Kirill:  Money should not decide how famous you can be.

Any advice for new bands?
Kirill:  Don’t write about things you don’t know anything about.

Future Plans?
Kirill:  I already have plans to play shows and maybe shoot a new video in the US, and I’m already working towards them.

Any last words?
Kirill:  Listen to the music that resonates in your heart, and keep being yourself.

Slashgore's most recent album Regeneration is available for purchase HERE!
Slashgore interview

June 4, 2016
Brutal Resonance

Slashgore

Jun 2016
Slashgore, though a relatively new face in the Russian industrial/electronic scene, has been putting out their music with all they have since 2014 with the release of their demo Possession. Collecting a pool of fans following the release of their initial demo, 2015 saw the release of their debut album Regeneration. And, now, I have spoken to Russia's own NuGothElectro masters, Slashgore. Read on below to find out a little bit about their history, influences, and much more! 


What's the history of Slashgore?

Kirill:  It’s been a long time since 2008. This was when I first started playing music, and after playing in a few bands, I created Slashgore. In this band I’m using my past experiences in music, and I’m still learning new things everyday. I've played in different genres from metalcore to dark electro, but now I have no boundaries, I’m mixing anything I like.

What genre of music do you consider Slashgore to be?
Kirill:  I’m mixing the genres that I like and I’m calling it NuGothElectro. For example, I took “Nu” from NuMetal, “Goth” because my music is dark, and electro because it’s electronic.

What's the inspiration behind your work?
Kirill:  In general I’m writing about my true past experiences and the feelings they evoke in me. But sometimes I write about things I like, such as movies (Night of the Demons, The Return of the Living Dead) and historical figures (President John F. Kennedy). All my songs have meaning or a message, and I hate hearing songs that are senseless and about nothing. It’s important to me to write this way for my listeners.

If you could work with any three people who would they be?
Kirill:  First, it’s Corey Taylor (Slipknot)

Next, Peter Murphy (Would be cool -old school and new school, you know?)

And I want to work with the American band, Earshot.

What can you tell me about your instruments? (i.e., Are you subject to brand loyalty or will you play with whatever is available? What made you choose the instruments you have now? Was it cost or was it a style/model/brand/colour preference?
Kirill:  I’m using the cheapest keyboard, I don’t even remember what brand it is, because I painted it black. It works well for me still, so I don’t need anything new. I’m changing only microphones, right now I’m using an AKG.


Tell us a joke.
Kirill:  I’m Russian, we don’t joke around.

Honestly, I have some fun stories from my shows and shooting my videos, but I can't remember them right now. Maybe next time.

So who would you say is your greatest musical influence and why?
Kirill:  It’s the band Slipknot. When I was a kid, I saw their music video and it completely amazed me. I realized I wanted to be involved with this kind of music.

Could you briefly describe the music-making process?
Kirill:  I can’t write without inspiration. I can’t just sit down and start writing. I can’t even sing if I’m not in the right mood. But luckily my muse doesn’t leave for too long. I like to write when I’m alone. When I get an idea for a song, first I write the music, and then I write my lyrics and melody.

What are your rehearsals generally like? Do you have a set time each week in which you practice or are rehearsals more spontaneous?
Kirill:  I’m practising more when I have a concert coming up. Otherwise, I’m practising when I’m writing something new.

What do you see as a musician's role in society?
Kirill:  I know my role in society, people write to me telling me that my music has helped them when they have felt depressed and alone, and they knew that someone else in this world understands how they feel.

I’m the voice of a disappointed generation and I’m glad to help them, emotionally.

If you could change one thing about the music industry, what would it be?
Kirill:  Money should not decide how famous you can be.

Any advice for new bands?
Kirill:  Don’t write about things you don’t know anything about.

Future Plans?
Kirill:  I already have plans to play shows and maybe shoot a new video in the US, and I’m already working towards them.

Any last words?
Kirill:  Listen to the music that resonates in your heart, and keep being yourself.

Slashgore's most recent album Regeneration is available for purchase HERE!

Jun 04 2016

John Crofts

info@brutalresonance.com
Writer and contributor on Brutal Resonance

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