Part 1: Music

First of all, thank you to you both for taking the time to conduct this chat. Since you released 'Zero', I've become aware of a much bigger movement involving Scream Machine. It seems that almost every man and his dog are now aware of the existence of the band. Consequently, do you feel the album was a success?
Sin - "You are very welcome and thank you for taking the time to talk with us. Yes, we definitely feel 'Zero' was a success, in that it was able to really grab people and introduce them to our sound and what we do. Anything that can open the door like that is absolutely a success. In many ways, 'Zero' was very personal as far as subject matter, too, and it's always awesome that people can feel that and feels where you are coming from."
Cosmo - "Thanks, Nick. I do feel 'Zero' was a success, not to mention a breakthrough for us as far as defining our sound. I am also really happy that people were able to identify with the subject matter of the songs. We have also met a lot of really great people in the past year or so in doing the promotion and things like that for 'Zero' and that is definitely really cool."

It's quite incredible, actually. Your upcoming release 'Devil Bitch' is something like your Eleventh record. It's unheard of for artists to be this prolific, especially when they're unsigned and making the music for their own personal passions. What have you learned since your debut release 'Spider Riot'?
Sin - "Thanks, man! Yeah, we do put a lot of material out. I really feel like there is no set formula anymore as far as how artists should approach this kind of thing. With the sheer volume of music that is out there now, you have to stay fresh to keep people's interest in you alive. It's a nice coincidence that we have enough material to be able to try and do that. And as far as what we've learned since 'Spider Riot', oh my God! So much! Mostly as far as actual composure and production but also what NOT to do as far as many things go and I think that we have really pinned down our signature sound and niche in the scene. In a way it's constraining but it also carries its own freedom, too, not to have to be constantly struggling to define yourself."
Cosmo - "We have definitely learned how to integrate different influences into our sound better, so that it has evolved into what you hear now. Getting feedback from other artists - and listeners - helps with this as well and we have been lucky to get feedback from some very respected and talented people. And while no one defines our sound but us, every criticism and every compliment has helped shape what you hear when you put on a Scream Machine album."

Listening to your records, the educated listener will likely compare SinDelle to Gen (from leading Industrial Rock / Fetish band Genitorturers), and Cosmo's guitar work to the Twist of Cain style of rock by Glenn Danzig. These are pretty big merits to be handed out. How does this feel and influence you?
Sin - "Well, we love Genitorturers and Danzig, so those are absolutely flattering comparisons. And in their own way, both are influences: the darker, more evil subject matter of Danzig and the more rock n roll debauchery of Genitorturers. There are so many others, too, from so many other genres. We really take elements from rock, metal, electro, industrial and many other areas. We try to be genre-defying and songs are created with not a genre or necessarily a specific sound in mind (except ours, of course) but what is the best evolution and end result for that particular song. That's why some are more rock, some are more electro, some are more industrial and some are more metal. I think that really is what defines Scream Machine's sound: that in some ways, nothing defines it."
Cosmo - "Thanks, dude. That is a huge compliment! John Christ (from Danzig) was one of many early influences as far as the guitar sound. There are so many others and it has kind of evolved into its own thing. One of the unique things about SM is that guitar work is not the focal point of the music, as it is with rock or metal bands and even some industrial. The guitar in SM is purposely simple most of the time, because it is used as just another instrument blended with the rest, often just used to create a heavier or fuller sound or to create a melody against the rest of the track. A lot of times it almost sounds like a synth anyway. So there really isn't any reason to make the guitar really technical or complicated. The music doesn't really require it."

I've always felt with a sound like you have, it's really hard to make a record sound new and original. Despite this, both of you have evolved and shown a clear knack for experimentation and evolution. After so many releases, have you considered where you'll go from 2011 and beyond? 'Zero' had a bonus track entitled "Monsters", which was more EBM than anything, with a consistent synth loop, and a suitably interesting video to boot. Can we expect more of this variety?
Sin - "Thanks. Glad you like the video for "Monsters". We had to put a warning on it, actually, because some people were offended by it. They should be glad they don't live with us. Hahahaha, they'd walk around perpetually offended. And oddly, even though we have so much back catalogue, I still feel like we are just getting started. Not sure how to explain that one, other than to say that with each new album or incarnation of Scream Machine, I feel like it's brand-new. I do feel like we are definitely progressing to a more industrial metal or harder machine rock type of sound but those EBM and electro influences are still strong and they are not going away. On 'Devil Bitch', songs like "The Witching Hour" and "Disease" are very synth-heavy and it is still very much an element in our stuff, most definitely. Some people start side projects when they want to experiment with different sounds. Not us. We throw it all into the same pot and mix it together, so I would say yes, absolutely we will still keep bringing the variety that people have come to expect from SM. We have some really exciting collaborations and projects coming out this year, so people should certainly stay tuned for that."
Cosmo - "Capturing the EBM sound is definitely still part of our make-up. Tracks on older albums are very EBM and electro, especially "Nona" and "Addicted To The Whip" and those things are still a huge part of Scream Machine. Sin and I are both true metalheads at heart, so it would be natural that as it goes, we would incorporate a more rock or metal sound into Scream Machine. But even the more metal or rock it becomes, it is all still very much industrial. That's why I like to use the term "machine rock", because to me, that's what it is. Other bands are starting to come out with things that are more machine rock than EBM or like the European synth-driven industrial and Scream Machine are right at the crest or threshold of that new movement. It's a very exciting thing and in a way, might help to explain Scream Machine's growing popularity, because by next year and moving forward, I think it is only going to get bigger. People are starting to move on from the same-sounding projects and bands and move toward a different sound."

Part 2: Personal

Onto more personal issues, most fans of Scream Machine know about the foundation of the band. It's interesting to see a Husband and Wife group that's doing so well without the use of additional musicians. Other than your obvious passion for each other and your music, what's the secret?
Sin - "I'm the boss. Hahahaha, just kidding. I guess in a way the secret is that we both inspire each other so much. Cosmo is every single emotion to me that you could think of: he embodies all my love, hate, disgust, lust, everything. In a way, my lyrics are all for him. That is not to say that we don't have issues with the creative process. There have been some knock-down, drag-out fights over songs or the way something is supposed to go or has turned out. We are both headstrong, opinionated people and it is not always easy to hammer two personalities into a box and make pretty music. In fact, it's impossible. That's why our music is so ugly. Hahahaha. But I think part of it is also that we know each other so well and we have a relationship outside of working and creating together. That makes a difference. It's also harder to kick your spouse out of your band. Hahahaha."
Cosmo - "I would almost feel like use of other musicians as far as working with Scream Machine full time would be somewhat of an invasion of our "baby". To us Scream Machine is another child that takes a lot of nurturing and care. Sure, we argue about the progress of tracks like every band does, but it's not ego driven. It's just clashing over ideas. At the end of the day it comes out to both of our liking and it comes out badass. I can honestly say there's not one song I actually don't like because every one of them has some type of personality or emotion of it's own that Sin and I created. That to me is what makes it not only powerful but passionate. I think that's why so many couples like our music. They can say - and have told us - "You know, we both understand exactly what you're feeling there!". That to us is an amazing thing."

Previous releases have seen covers of Janis Joplin's "Mercedes Benz", alongside typically gritty and filthy concepts such as "Auschwitz" - a comparison I never thought I'd make. Your diversity is refreshing. What are your musical backgrounds?
Sin - "Thanks! That is one of my favorite compliments. I have been writing poetry and melodies for years and years. I played instruments in school, like the rest of us band nerds and that kind of thing. I play a little guitar, a little bass. But to me, I have always been a singer. I would rather sing than do just about anything else and that is real. I think sometimes that part of the reason we produce so much material is that I waited so long to start composing my own material, so I have so much built up. As far as influences, I have always been a metalhead or a rock fan at heart and that has certainly not changed. I came to industrial through the more metal or rock-derived industrial sound. I love the old heavy metal and 80's rock and metal. I'm listening to KISS as I write this. You would be more likely to hear me blasting Skid Row or Slayer as I drive by than anything else. I also listen to country, soft rock, punk and rap. I have everything Eminem ever did. It really is an emotionally-driven thing for me: What do I feel like hearing? Some of my influences and favorites would be Slayer, Metallica, Skid Row, Iron Maiden, Rob Zombie, BILE, Suicide Commando (shocker, right?), Lords of Acid, Green Day, Rancid, Good Charlotte, Matchbox 20, Melissa Etheridge, Janis Joplin, Stevie Nicks... I could go on and on. I especially like Janis. She and I have very similar vocal styles and we also have the same birthday."
Cosmo - "It's really awesome you mention Auschwitz! You'd be surprised how unrecognized Electrowitch has been considering that was the album that busted out to a more machine rock sound for us. Thanks for that! As far as musical backgrounds are concerned, like a lot of people I've talked to about this, I am a metalhead that progressed to industrial through such bands as Ministry, NIN, Atari Teenage Riot, and Chemlab. Much like Sin I dig 80's and early 90's metal. Much of the same bands and I would just clog up your eyes with pages of bands if I named them all. Nowadays I have been listening to more bands like us in addition to influential music such as DIVERJE, Suicide Assyst, Lockjaw, Project Rotten and a lot more. With me music tastes never stops. It's an elixir of life for me."

When I previously reviewed 'Zero', my main concern coming away from the record was the evolution of Cosmo's guitar work. I thought it talented, and reminiscent to Rob Zombie at times, but too similar for a 13 track album. I'm delighted to see that this has been taken on board. With such a boost to your publicity, have you had any label interest as a result?
Sin & Cosmo - "Well, like was said earlier, the guitar work is often very simple on purpose so as not to distract from the overall sound of the song but yes, we have always been experimenting with the sounds and evolution of all of the instruments. Glad you like how it came out! As far as labels, yes actually there have been a few here and there that would like to help with distribution and things like that and one or two that were interested in more."

My understanding is that the two of you are also proud parents. How challenging is it to balance a family life around recording?
Sin - "It is not easy. Scream Machine is a full-time job and so is being a parent. We also have quite a few kids here, so that makes it harder. I have three kids of my own; our son lives here with us and my oldest daughters live with their dad but they come over a lot and it's always a circus when they are here because three of my nieces live here with us, too. With the exception of my oldest daughter who is 14, that makes five kids who are all ten years old or younger. So, yeah... it can be difficult. But we try to approach it with a sense of humor. The words to "Bad Motherfucker" were originally a joke aimed at the kids. I was sitting there, playing with this awesome melody and unable to think of words for it. The kids were running around being bad and not listening - like they love to do when I am distracted - and I started saying all those things to them: I'll break your face, I'll break your legs, etc. And I recorded them as a joke (which the kids thought was hilarious) but when Cosmo heard them, he said we should keep them. So we did. The noise factor is probably the worst thing. With 4 kids in the house at all times, there is really nowhere you can go that's quiet."

It's quite clear that SinDelle is the frontwoman of the band. The rarity of having an outspoken, "in your face" female in the band seems to have made a large impression. I remember being stunned by the severity and aggression of Sin's "bitchy" vocals. How much, if any, of this is rehearsed?
Sin - "Thanks, man! I am so glad you asked this. Women need to be more represented in this genre and it needs to be shown that they can be just as aggressive as men. Luckily I'm just the bitch to do that. So how much of it is rehearsed? None of it. I'm sure many people wonder about that but that is my real personality, hahahaha. Maybe I shouldn't admit that but then again, when you meet me there is really no hiding it, so I guess it's all the same. I have always said that for my level of aggression I should be a 6ft tall, 250lb man instead of a 5ft tall, 100lb woman. I used to have an anger and violence problem when I was younger but I had to get it under control when I had kids. Can't keep going to jail for assaulting people and that kind of thing when you have kids at home. I found other outlets. Finally. Hahahaha."
Cosmo - "Dude, none of it is image or rehearsed. Trust me. I wrote about this in one of my blogs. Though she comes across as sugar and spice, this is also a woman hardcore enough to use oregano oil like Listerine. She can throw one punch and fracture your eye socket and cause a concussion. Her vocal influence is the likes of Sebastian Bach, Axl Rose, and Janis Joplin. Though she isn't outwardly violent anymore; she is still very aggressive. She saves the violence for Scream Machine and you can hear it. Hell, just check out one of our rehearsals sometime. Her aggression is magnetic. Without it there would be no Scream Machine."

Finally, I'm seeing you guys appearing on podcasts and Industrial Radios, as well as your own SMRadio. There are people out there who are desperate to boost your mainstream popularity. I recall you previously declaring that you didn't strictly require a label. Have things changed in the last year?
Sin -" Thanks for mentioning SMRadio! We are so grateful for every play that we get and we are so happy that other people want to really be a part of Scream Machine and help bring it to the next level. It's all about being a part of something. That's why we take so much time to bring people who enjoy our music into things. That's why we never want to forget that without people who enjoy it, there is nothing to be proud of. They ARE a part of it, as much as we are. I don't see us needing a label anytime soon. The face and landscape of music has changed. You can get pretty far by yourself, without label backing. Especially in industrial, where "label backing" doesn't mean what it means in other genres. It's people like you guys who are the biggest help and who we owe the most, so thank you so much."
Cosmo - "Things really have changed dramatically. Just on our Facebook page alone our "likes" have more than tripled since 'Zero' was released. People have ordered many CD's and we have constant interest expressed in our music. People come to us wanting to collaborate or to play their venues or festivals almost daily. We are friends with many people involved with labels and larger acts in the scene. The thing is, the growing interest in Scream Machine was attained without the help of a label. To an extent, people who run labels seem to respect us for this. I really don't see us getting signed anytime soon, either. Not only are we Scream Machine but we are a PR machine. If we did all this ourselves, we really don't need a label. We may agree to distribution or possibly some type of sponsorship thing, but we could never sign away our music. We'd rather retire than do that."

It's been a pleasure to once again converse with the two of you. Your workload is impressive, and you make time for everyone, which is a trait in this scene that I cannot respect enough. Certain bands have embarrassed themselves with codes of conduct, and I know that you've touched upon this with a fair dose of humour and respect on some of your V-log updates. It's nice to see you as individuals as well as musicians. That being said, I'd like to give you both a chance to end this interview in your own unique way. Sign us off, by talking about anything you want.
Sin - "Thank you so much, for the interview and your words. We try and be real people, man. Because there are no rockstars in this genre and we know that. And even if there were, it wouldn't be us. We are just two nobodies with a passion for music. Really. I just want to say thank you to everyone who gave us a chance and continues to choose to spend their time - and their money - on us. I'm not sure if they know what it means, or how amazing it is and always will be to us that people choose to spend either of these things on something we made, and I'm not sure if I could ever tell them but I wanted to put it out there."
Cosmo - "Well, thanks Nick for taking the time to interview us. Everyone else that has not only shown support but have become great friends who have the utmost loyalty to us, I have nothing but respect for each and every one of them. We never call any of them fans, more of a family. That's how cool ya'll are. Stay sick, motherfuckers!"
Scream Machine interview
June 10, 2011
Brutal Resonance

Scream Machine

Jun 2011
Part 1: Music

First of all, thank you to you both for taking the time to conduct this chat. Since you released 'Zero', I've become aware of a much bigger movement involving Scream Machine. It seems that almost every man and his dog are now aware of the existence of the band. Consequently, do you feel the album was a success?
Sin - "You are very welcome and thank you for taking the time to talk with us. Yes, we definitely feel 'Zero' was a success, in that it was able to really grab people and introduce them to our sound and what we do. Anything that can open the door like that is absolutely a success. In many ways, 'Zero' was very personal as far as subject matter, too, and it's always awesome that people can feel that and feels where you are coming from."
Cosmo - "Thanks, Nick. I do feel 'Zero' was a success, not to mention a breakthrough for us as far as defining our sound. I am also really happy that people were able to identify with the subject matter of the songs. We have also met a lot of really great people in the past year or so in doing the promotion and things like that for 'Zero' and that is definitely really cool."

It's quite incredible, actually. Your upcoming release 'Devil Bitch' is something like your Eleventh record. It's unheard of for artists to be this prolific, especially when they're unsigned and making the music for their own personal passions. What have you learned since your debut release 'Spider Riot'?
Sin - "Thanks, man! Yeah, we do put a lot of material out. I really feel like there is no set formula anymore as far as how artists should approach this kind of thing. With the sheer volume of music that is out there now, you have to stay fresh to keep people's interest in you alive. It's a nice coincidence that we have enough material to be able to try and do that. And as far as what we've learned since 'Spider Riot', oh my God! So much! Mostly as far as actual composure and production but also what NOT to do as far as many things go and I think that we have really pinned down our signature sound and niche in the scene. In a way it's constraining but it also carries its own freedom, too, not to have to be constantly struggling to define yourself."
Cosmo - "We have definitely learned how to integrate different influences into our sound better, so that it has evolved into what you hear now. Getting feedback from other artists - and listeners - helps with this as well and we have been lucky to get feedback from some very respected and talented people. And while no one defines our sound but us, every criticism and every compliment has helped shape what you hear when you put on a Scream Machine album."

Listening to your records, the educated listener will likely compare SinDelle to Gen (from leading Industrial Rock / Fetish band Genitorturers), and Cosmo's guitar work to the Twist of Cain style of rock by Glenn Danzig. These are pretty big merits to be handed out. How does this feel and influence you?
Sin - "Well, we love Genitorturers and Danzig, so those are absolutely flattering comparisons. And in their own way, both are influences: the darker, more evil subject matter of Danzig and the more rock n roll debauchery of Genitorturers. There are so many others, too, from so many other genres. We really take elements from rock, metal, electro, industrial and many other areas. We try to be genre-defying and songs are created with not a genre or necessarily a specific sound in mind (except ours, of course) but what is the best evolution and end result for that particular song. That's why some are more rock, some are more electro, some are more industrial and some are more metal. I think that really is what defines Scream Machine's sound: that in some ways, nothing defines it."
Cosmo - "Thanks, dude. That is a huge compliment! John Christ (from Danzig) was one of many early influences as far as the guitar sound. There are so many others and it has kind of evolved into its own thing. One of the unique things about SM is that guitar work is not the focal point of the music, as it is with rock or metal bands and even some industrial. The guitar in SM is purposely simple most of the time, because it is used as just another instrument blended with the rest, often just used to create a heavier or fuller sound or to create a melody against the rest of the track. A lot of times it almost sounds like a synth anyway. So there really isn't any reason to make the guitar really technical or complicated. The music doesn't really require it."

I've always felt with a sound like you have, it's really hard to make a record sound new and original. Despite this, both of you have evolved and shown a clear knack for experimentation and evolution. After so many releases, have you considered where you'll go from 2011 and beyond? 'Zero' had a bonus track entitled "Monsters", which was more EBM than anything, with a consistent synth loop, and a suitably interesting video to boot. Can we expect more of this variety?
Sin - "Thanks. Glad you like the video for "Monsters". We had to put a warning on it, actually, because some people were offended by it. They should be glad they don't live with us. Hahahaha, they'd walk around perpetually offended. And oddly, even though we have so much back catalogue, I still feel like we are just getting started. Not sure how to explain that one, other than to say that with each new album or incarnation of Scream Machine, I feel like it's brand-new. I do feel like we are definitely progressing to a more industrial metal or harder machine rock type of sound but those EBM and electro influences are still strong and they are not going away. On 'Devil Bitch', songs like "The Witching Hour" and "Disease" are very synth-heavy and it is still very much an element in our stuff, most definitely. Some people start side projects when they want to experiment with different sounds. Not us. We throw it all into the same pot and mix it together, so I would say yes, absolutely we will still keep bringing the variety that people have come to expect from SM. We have some really exciting collaborations and projects coming out this year, so people should certainly stay tuned for that."
Cosmo - "Capturing the EBM sound is definitely still part of our make-up. Tracks on older albums are very EBM and electro, especially "Nona" and "Addicted To The Whip" and those things are still a huge part of Scream Machine. Sin and I are both true metalheads at heart, so it would be natural that as it goes, we would incorporate a more rock or metal sound into Scream Machine. But even the more metal or rock it becomes, it is all still very much industrial. That's why I like to use the term "machine rock", because to me, that's what it is. Other bands are starting to come out with things that are more machine rock than EBM or like the European synth-driven industrial and Scream Machine are right at the crest or threshold of that new movement. It's a very exciting thing and in a way, might help to explain Scream Machine's growing popularity, because by next year and moving forward, I think it is only going to get bigger. People are starting to move on from the same-sounding projects and bands and move toward a different sound."

Part 2: Personal

Onto more personal issues, most fans of Scream Machine know about the foundation of the band. It's interesting to see a Husband and Wife group that's doing so well without the use of additional musicians. Other than your obvious passion for each other and your music, what's the secret?
Sin - "I'm the boss. Hahahaha, just kidding. I guess in a way the secret is that we both inspire each other so much. Cosmo is every single emotion to me that you could think of: he embodies all my love, hate, disgust, lust, everything. In a way, my lyrics are all for him. That is not to say that we don't have issues with the creative process. There have been some knock-down, drag-out fights over songs or the way something is supposed to go or has turned out. We are both headstrong, opinionated people and it is not always easy to hammer two personalities into a box and make pretty music. In fact, it's impossible. That's why our music is so ugly. Hahahaha. But I think part of it is also that we know each other so well and we have a relationship outside of working and creating together. That makes a difference. It's also harder to kick your spouse out of your band. Hahahaha."
Cosmo - "I would almost feel like use of other musicians as far as working with Scream Machine full time would be somewhat of an invasion of our "baby". To us Scream Machine is another child that takes a lot of nurturing and care. Sure, we argue about the progress of tracks like every band does, but it's not ego driven. It's just clashing over ideas. At the end of the day it comes out to both of our liking and it comes out badass. I can honestly say there's not one song I actually don't like because every one of them has some type of personality or emotion of it's own that Sin and I created. That to me is what makes it not only powerful but passionate. I think that's why so many couples like our music. They can say - and have told us - "You know, we both understand exactly what you're feeling there!". That to us is an amazing thing."

Previous releases have seen covers of Janis Joplin's "Mercedes Benz", alongside typically gritty and filthy concepts such as "Auschwitz" - a comparison I never thought I'd make. Your diversity is refreshing. What are your musical backgrounds?
Sin - "Thanks! That is one of my favorite compliments. I have been writing poetry and melodies for years and years. I played instruments in school, like the rest of us band nerds and that kind of thing. I play a little guitar, a little bass. But to me, I have always been a singer. I would rather sing than do just about anything else and that is real. I think sometimes that part of the reason we produce so much material is that I waited so long to start composing my own material, so I have so much built up. As far as influences, I have always been a metalhead or a rock fan at heart and that has certainly not changed. I came to industrial through the more metal or rock-derived industrial sound. I love the old heavy metal and 80's rock and metal. I'm listening to KISS as I write this. You would be more likely to hear me blasting Skid Row or Slayer as I drive by than anything else. I also listen to country, soft rock, punk and rap. I have everything Eminem ever did. It really is an emotionally-driven thing for me: What do I feel like hearing? Some of my influences and favorites would be Slayer, Metallica, Skid Row, Iron Maiden, Rob Zombie, BILE, Suicide Commando (shocker, right?), Lords of Acid, Green Day, Rancid, Good Charlotte, Matchbox 20, Melissa Etheridge, Janis Joplin, Stevie Nicks... I could go on and on. I especially like Janis. She and I have very similar vocal styles and we also have the same birthday."
Cosmo - "It's really awesome you mention Auschwitz! You'd be surprised how unrecognized Electrowitch has been considering that was the album that busted out to a more machine rock sound for us. Thanks for that! As far as musical backgrounds are concerned, like a lot of people I've talked to about this, I am a metalhead that progressed to industrial through such bands as Ministry, NIN, Atari Teenage Riot, and Chemlab. Much like Sin I dig 80's and early 90's metal. Much of the same bands and I would just clog up your eyes with pages of bands if I named them all. Nowadays I have been listening to more bands like us in addition to influential music such as DIVERJE, Suicide Assyst, Lockjaw, Project Rotten and a lot more. With me music tastes never stops. It's an elixir of life for me."

When I previously reviewed 'Zero', my main concern coming away from the record was the evolution of Cosmo's guitar work. I thought it talented, and reminiscent to Rob Zombie at times, but too similar for a 13 track album. I'm delighted to see that this has been taken on board. With such a boost to your publicity, have you had any label interest as a result?
Sin & Cosmo - "Well, like was said earlier, the guitar work is often very simple on purpose so as not to distract from the overall sound of the song but yes, we have always been experimenting with the sounds and evolution of all of the instruments. Glad you like how it came out! As far as labels, yes actually there have been a few here and there that would like to help with distribution and things like that and one or two that were interested in more."

My understanding is that the two of you are also proud parents. How challenging is it to balance a family life around recording?
Sin - "It is not easy. Scream Machine is a full-time job and so is being a parent. We also have quite a few kids here, so that makes it harder. I have three kids of my own; our son lives here with us and my oldest daughters live with their dad but they come over a lot and it's always a circus when they are here because three of my nieces live here with us, too. With the exception of my oldest daughter who is 14, that makes five kids who are all ten years old or younger. So, yeah... it can be difficult. But we try to approach it with a sense of humor. The words to "Bad Motherfucker" were originally a joke aimed at the kids. I was sitting there, playing with this awesome melody and unable to think of words for it. The kids were running around being bad and not listening - like they love to do when I am distracted - and I started saying all those things to them: I'll break your face, I'll break your legs, etc. And I recorded them as a joke (which the kids thought was hilarious) but when Cosmo heard them, he said we should keep them. So we did. The noise factor is probably the worst thing. With 4 kids in the house at all times, there is really nowhere you can go that's quiet."

It's quite clear that SinDelle is the frontwoman of the band. The rarity of having an outspoken, "in your face" female in the band seems to have made a large impression. I remember being stunned by the severity and aggression of Sin's "bitchy" vocals. How much, if any, of this is rehearsed?
Sin - "Thanks, man! I am so glad you asked this. Women need to be more represented in this genre and it needs to be shown that they can be just as aggressive as men. Luckily I'm just the bitch to do that. So how much of it is rehearsed? None of it. I'm sure many people wonder about that but that is my real personality, hahahaha. Maybe I shouldn't admit that but then again, when you meet me there is really no hiding it, so I guess it's all the same. I have always said that for my level of aggression I should be a 6ft tall, 250lb man instead of a 5ft tall, 100lb woman. I used to have an anger and violence problem when I was younger but I had to get it under control when I had kids. Can't keep going to jail for assaulting people and that kind of thing when you have kids at home. I found other outlets. Finally. Hahahaha."
Cosmo - "Dude, none of it is image or rehearsed. Trust me. I wrote about this in one of my blogs. Though she comes across as sugar and spice, this is also a woman hardcore enough to use oregano oil like Listerine. She can throw one punch and fracture your eye socket and cause a concussion. Her vocal influence is the likes of Sebastian Bach, Axl Rose, and Janis Joplin. Though she isn't outwardly violent anymore; she is still very aggressive. She saves the violence for Scream Machine and you can hear it. Hell, just check out one of our rehearsals sometime. Her aggression is magnetic. Without it there would be no Scream Machine."

Finally, I'm seeing you guys appearing on podcasts and Industrial Radios, as well as your own SMRadio. There are people out there who are desperate to boost your mainstream popularity. I recall you previously declaring that you didn't strictly require a label. Have things changed in the last year?
Sin -" Thanks for mentioning SMRadio! We are so grateful for every play that we get and we are so happy that other people want to really be a part of Scream Machine and help bring it to the next level. It's all about being a part of something. That's why we take so much time to bring people who enjoy our music into things. That's why we never want to forget that without people who enjoy it, there is nothing to be proud of. They ARE a part of it, as much as we are. I don't see us needing a label anytime soon. The face and landscape of music has changed. You can get pretty far by yourself, without label backing. Especially in industrial, where "label backing" doesn't mean what it means in other genres. It's people like you guys who are the biggest help and who we owe the most, so thank you so much."
Cosmo - "Things really have changed dramatically. Just on our Facebook page alone our "likes" have more than tripled since 'Zero' was released. People have ordered many CD's and we have constant interest expressed in our music. People come to us wanting to collaborate or to play their venues or festivals almost daily. We are friends with many people involved with labels and larger acts in the scene. The thing is, the growing interest in Scream Machine was attained without the help of a label. To an extent, people who run labels seem to respect us for this. I really don't see us getting signed anytime soon, either. Not only are we Scream Machine but we are a PR machine. If we did all this ourselves, we really don't need a label. We may agree to distribution or possibly some type of sponsorship thing, but we could never sign away our music. We'd rather retire than do that."

It's been a pleasure to once again converse with the two of you. Your workload is impressive, and you make time for everyone, which is a trait in this scene that I cannot respect enough. Certain bands have embarrassed themselves with codes of conduct, and I know that you've touched upon this with a fair dose of humour and respect on some of your V-log updates. It's nice to see you as individuals as well as musicians. That being said, I'd like to give you both a chance to end this interview in your own unique way. Sign us off, by talking about anything you want.
Sin - "Thank you so much, for the interview and your words. We try and be real people, man. Because there are no rockstars in this genre and we know that. And even if there were, it wouldn't be us. We are just two nobodies with a passion for music. Really. I just want to say thank you to everyone who gave us a chance and continues to choose to spend their time - and their money - on us. I'm not sure if they know what it means, or how amazing it is and always will be to us that people choose to spend either of these things on something we made, and I'm not sure if I could ever tell them but I wanted to put it out there."
Cosmo - "Well, thanks Nick for taking the time to interview us. Everyone else that has not only shown support but have become great friends who have the utmost loyalty to us, I have nothing but respect for each and every one of them. We never call any of them fans, more of a family. That's how cool ya'll are. Stay sick, motherfuckers!"
Jun 10 2011

Nick Quarm

info@brutalresonance.com
Writer and contributor on Brutal Resonance

Share this interview

Facebook
Twitter
Google+
16
Shares

Popular interviews

Psyclon Nine

Interview, Mar 24 2017

Kite

Interview, Feb 10 2017

God Destruction

Interview, May 17 2016

SHIV-R

Interview, Sep 21 2017

Night Runner

Interview, Oct 13 2016

Related articles

Scream Machine - 'Zero'

Review, Jan 17 2011

Voster - 'World War V'

Review, Mar 23 2013

Shortly about us

Started in spring 2009, Brutal Resonance quickly grew from a Swedish based netzine into an established International zine of the highest standard.

We cover genres like Synthpop, EBM, Industrial, Dark Ambient, Neofolk, Darkwave, Noise and all their sub- and similar genres.

© Brutal Resonance 2009-2016
Designed by and developed by Head of Mímir 2016