Following the release of 'Depersonalization', Nick Quarm felt it was the ideal time to catch up with Clint Robertson, and find out just what's been going on in the 3 years since 'Antipathy'...

Hello Clint, thanks for agreeing to an interview. It is always an exciting time to launch a new album. 'Depersonalization' marks your second full-length, and it's released, like 'Antipathy' before it, through Cop Intl. How has the response been?
- "It's too early to tell, but, as far as I am seeing the response is quite positive, in a way that I had hoped it would be. Generally, a second album is a scary place to be, especially after a 3 year wait. I will know alot more once touring begins, same as the first CD. It was the shows with Nachtmahr and Funker Vogt, with random people coming up to me that let me know people were really paying attention."


You've been quite the talking point since you utilized the cockroach as your project's logo, and took a photo of yourself with roaches on your face. Contrary to popular belief, you do actually own and breed the creatures. Did nolongerhuman come about before the roaches, or were they an already existing inspiration to the logo?
- "I find it perfect for me as a person. Such a hated and misunderstood breed of creature. I have had experiences with cockroaches all throughout life, my decision to own them was somewhat shocking for most people in my life, but, it makes perfect sense to me, so much so, that I decided to get tattoos of them. nolongerhuman came before I owned roaches, but, the meaning, the feeling behind the band was really just waiting for an image to suit it. With the cockroaches, I found that image."


The internet has been cruel to you, as already,there's at least 5 demos (according to Last.Fm and Discogs), all of these are pirated, or fan-made, excluding the CD 'Vestigial', which you released in 15 hand numbered copies. This is mostly memorable for its cover art, can you tell us about it?
- "Oh, the internet by those terms is cruel to every artist. I have never really minded people pirating things of mine in most cases. You get what you pay for. If a person really loves the music, they will want the full package, the art, the best quality music, and that is the CD, MP3's don't compare, in particular to this genre of music, where so much of the energy is in the extreme low and high end. There is also a great disconnect between musicians and their music, and I think alot of bands just make this worse. With nolongerhuman, it isn't hard to find me, there is one person behind every decision and every song. If you want to talk to me, as a fan, fellow musician, or, just because you are bored, I am the one answering emails, I am the one managing Facebook, etc. I do no have a middle man, and I am open to talking to anyone, anytime. I think being personal, connecting with people on that level, make the music more "human" and motivates people to buy the CD, simply because they can see, the money they pay goes directly to me, to finance more music, more merchandise, and more shows. Every penny I receive for music goes right back into the scene, along with nearly every dime I make on my own. The cover art for Vestigial, i's interesting, I wanted it to match the design for the first shirt, since they were to be sold as a package. I really liked the idea, which later developed into a song "Our New World" that people are all the same, all brainwashed, and the rarest thing you can do, is to stand out from the crowd. I will often use the album art to underscore that visually."


You only have two tracks that are not released on an album, 'Survival' from the first 'Electronic Music to Cure Cancer' box, and 'Reflections' from WTII's 'Minifest 2' Sampler. 'Survival' is exclusive, but I know that your fans would be keen to hear 'Reflections'. Is there a chance of a re-issue of this at some point?
- "Survival, yes, was only for the Electronic Music to Cure Cancer, and was written with that comp project in mind, so, that will be the only place to get it legitimately. Reflections, you may, just may see an updated version of on the 3rd CD. There are actually a few out there that have never seen release, Fifth Season, Perfect Society, and a couple others that I sometimes see bootlegs of pop up online, but, unless nolongerhuman releases a "b-sides" type compilation, I don't know that they will see the light of day, at least not for a few years."


You had a project called 'Varix' previously, which I believe has never officially released anything. What are your plans on resurrecting this project?
- "Varix was 15 years ago, and really was me dipping my toe into recording anything. There was a varix release on a compilation, Depth of Beyond on Troniks records around 1997. One track on a two cassette compilation, called "holo". As of now, there are no plans to resurrect the project. It was very much power noise, and there are so many bands out there doing that genre so much better than I could."


I've managed to witness a few live performances of yours, via YouTube (Legal or not, I don't know). What will it take to get you to play over in Europe, and how can readers of this zine help with that?
- "Isn't everything on YouTube legal? Heh. What will it take? Well, the desire is there, getting to play in Europe is one of the benchmarks I think any musicians in this genre aspires to. As far as making it happen, I am ready any time. All it would take is a promoter with the available time to dedicate to it, to make it happen. Readers, the best help they can provide is word of mouth, always. Tell everyone, make them listen, request it at clubs, just make sure that everyone, everywhere knows about the music. That is the best anyone can hope for. Basically, if enough people request it, it will happen."


It's rare for acts of your stature, but I don't recall ever seeing anyone remix you, or vice versa. Is remixing a part of Industrial that you plan to venture into?
- "Remixes. Hm. I have done a couple, I did one for Psykkle out of Canada, one for Infrablack, just finished one for Frontal Boundary. As for people mixing nolongerhuman, I have never really thought it necessary. Most mixes are just album filler anyway, however, there are a few in the works, and I hope for great results. I think what most people don't realize is that more half the remixes you see are paid for out of the original artists pocket. I don't see the point in paying a few hundred for a bunch of mixes of songs, when I myself don't charge for remixes, which leads to why I don't do many. Since I do them for free, I have to see something about the song that I want to work with or it is just a waste of my time."


When I reviewed 'Depersonalization', I picked up on a martial, disciplined concept. When I recieved the booklet, I was pleased to see that it was put together to reflect this, and as a result, makes for a very neat little read. One question I do have is about the excellent artwork.
What were your ideas behind it?

- "I really have to tip my proverbial cap to Vlad McNeally there. My design skills are very limited, my imagination is not. Working with him, I remember sending him an email which basically just told him the picture I had in my head in vague terms. The first time he sent me a rough draft of the cover I knew I had found the right artist for the job. He almost literally just managed to find the perfect images, layers and effects for everything. I had wanted something decidedly militant, because I saw the direct the music was going, and I have a special fondness for WWI and WWII imagery, history, etc. So, I brought all of that to Vlad, telling him I wanted to work in military colors, old destroyed photos, sepia tones, and over the course of the process it just kept getting better."


It won't be the end of nolongerhuman, what's next on the cards for you?
- "Reset, restart. The last three years have been hell. I have lived in three states and 5 towns, sold, and repurchased the studio, lost some of the most important people in my life, been homeless twice, all while trying to keep nolongerhuman alive in my head. So, now is a time where I am back in the studio, rebuilding, and using those experiences to make a new album. I have a few track submissions planned, and I really would like to put together an EP, as May make 5 years for nolongerhuman. So, I may release something in limited form to commemorate. Beyond that though, I will be doing as I always do, observing humanity, and writing my opinions."


As always, we ask you to end the interview on your terms. Please use this question as a soapbox to express anything you want to say, and give a message to the readers. Thank you very much for arranging this interview, and congratulations on 'Depersonalization'! Over to you, Clint.
- "Most of what I want to say you can find in my lyrics, heh. I guess, I just think it is important for this scene, as a whole, starts listening to the music. Yes, the fashion is important, yes, being able to dance to it is great, but really listen to the music, look for the meaning that speaks to you. That's what started this genre, bands that had an agenda, a purpose. It wasn't based on horror movies, or songs about fucking. That was left to the mainstream. If you find a band that speaks to you, support it in any way you can, for as long as you can. Most of us live paycheck to paycheck like everyone else, this is something we do because we love to do it, or we need to, but it is a full time job. If you love the music, let the band know. It never goes unappreciated."
nolongerhuman interview
March 28, 2012
Brutal Resonance

nolongerhuman

Mar 2012
Following the release of 'Depersonalization', Nick Quarm felt it was the ideal time to catch up with Clint Robertson, and find out just what's been going on in the 3 years since 'Antipathy'...

Hello Clint, thanks for agreeing to an interview. It is always an exciting time to launch a new album. 'Depersonalization' marks your second full-length, and it's released, like 'Antipathy' before it, through Cop Intl. How has the response been?
- "It's too early to tell, but, as far as I am seeing the response is quite positive, in a way that I had hoped it would be. Generally, a second album is a scary place to be, especially after a 3 year wait. I will know alot more once touring begins, same as the first CD. It was the shows with Nachtmahr and Funker Vogt, with random people coming up to me that let me know people were really paying attention."


You've been quite the talking point since you utilized the cockroach as your project's logo, and took a photo of yourself with roaches on your face. Contrary to popular belief, you do actually own and breed the creatures. Did nolongerhuman come about before the roaches, or were they an already existing inspiration to the logo?
- "I find it perfect for me as a person. Such a hated and misunderstood breed of creature. I have had experiences with cockroaches all throughout life, my decision to own them was somewhat shocking for most people in my life, but, it makes perfect sense to me, so much so, that I decided to get tattoos of them. nolongerhuman came before I owned roaches, but, the meaning, the feeling behind the band was really just waiting for an image to suit it. With the cockroaches, I found that image."


The internet has been cruel to you, as already,there's at least 5 demos (according to Last.Fm and Discogs), all of these are pirated, or fan-made, excluding the CD 'Vestigial', which you released in 15 hand numbered copies. This is mostly memorable for its cover art, can you tell us about it?
- "Oh, the internet by those terms is cruel to every artist. I have never really minded people pirating things of mine in most cases. You get what you pay for. If a person really loves the music, they will want the full package, the art, the best quality music, and that is the CD, MP3's don't compare, in particular to this genre of music, where so much of the energy is in the extreme low and high end. There is also a great disconnect between musicians and their music, and I think alot of bands just make this worse. With nolongerhuman, it isn't hard to find me, there is one person behind every decision and every song. If you want to talk to me, as a fan, fellow musician, or, just because you are bored, I am the one answering emails, I am the one managing Facebook, etc. I do no have a middle man, and I am open to talking to anyone, anytime. I think being personal, connecting with people on that level, make the music more "human" and motivates people to buy the CD, simply because they can see, the money they pay goes directly to me, to finance more music, more merchandise, and more shows. Every penny I receive for music goes right back into the scene, along with nearly every dime I make on my own. The cover art for Vestigial, i's interesting, I wanted it to match the design for the first shirt, since they were to be sold as a package. I really liked the idea, which later developed into a song "Our New World" that people are all the same, all brainwashed, and the rarest thing you can do, is to stand out from the crowd. I will often use the album art to underscore that visually."


You only have two tracks that are not released on an album, 'Survival' from the first 'Electronic Music to Cure Cancer' box, and 'Reflections' from WTII's 'Minifest 2' Sampler. 'Survival' is exclusive, but I know that your fans would be keen to hear 'Reflections'. Is there a chance of a re-issue of this at some point?
- "Survival, yes, was only for the Electronic Music to Cure Cancer, and was written with that comp project in mind, so, that will be the only place to get it legitimately. Reflections, you may, just may see an updated version of on the 3rd CD. There are actually a few out there that have never seen release, Fifth Season, Perfect Society, and a couple others that I sometimes see bootlegs of pop up online, but, unless nolongerhuman releases a "b-sides" type compilation, I don't know that they will see the light of day, at least not for a few years."


You had a project called 'Varix' previously, which I believe has never officially released anything. What are your plans on resurrecting this project?
- "Varix was 15 years ago, and really was me dipping my toe into recording anything. There was a varix release on a compilation, Depth of Beyond on Troniks records around 1997. One track on a two cassette compilation, called "holo". As of now, there are no plans to resurrect the project. It was very much power noise, and there are so many bands out there doing that genre so much better than I could."


I've managed to witness a few live performances of yours, via YouTube (Legal or not, I don't know). What will it take to get you to play over in Europe, and how can readers of this zine help with that?
- "Isn't everything on YouTube legal? Heh. What will it take? Well, the desire is there, getting to play in Europe is one of the benchmarks I think any musicians in this genre aspires to. As far as making it happen, I am ready any time. All it would take is a promoter with the available time to dedicate to it, to make it happen. Readers, the best help they can provide is word of mouth, always. Tell everyone, make them listen, request it at clubs, just make sure that everyone, everywhere knows about the music. That is the best anyone can hope for. Basically, if enough people request it, it will happen."


It's rare for acts of your stature, but I don't recall ever seeing anyone remix you, or vice versa. Is remixing a part of Industrial that you plan to venture into?
- "Remixes. Hm. I have done a couple, I did one for Psykkle out of Canada, one for Infrablack, just finished one for Frontal Boundary. As for people mixing nolongerhuman, I have never really thought it necessary. Most mixes are just album filler anyway, however, there are a few in the works, and I hope for great results. I think what most people don't realize is that more half the remixes you see are paid for out of the original artists pocket. I don't see the point in paying a few hundred for a bunch of mixes of songs, when I myself don't charge for remixes, which leads to why I don't do many. Since I do them for free, I have to see something about the song that I want to work with or it is just a waste of my time."


When I reviewed 'Depersonalization', I picked up on a martial, disciplined concept. When I recieved the booklet, I was pleased to see that it was put together to reflect this, and as a result, makes for a very neat little read. One question I do have is about the excellent artwork.
What were your ideas behind it?

- "I really have to tip my proverbial cap to Vlad McNeally there. My design skills are very limited, my imagination is not. Working with him, I remember sending him an email which basically just told him the picture I had in my head in vague terms. The first time he sent me a rough draft of the cover I knew I had found the right artist for the job. He almost literally just managed to find the perfect images, layers and effects for everything. I had wanted something decidedly militant, because I saw the direct the music was going, and I have a special fondness for WWI and WWII imagery, history, etc. So, I brought all of that to Vlad, telling him I wanted to work in military colors, old destroyed photos, sepia tones, and over the course of the process it just kept getting better."


It won't be the end of nolongerhuman, what's next on the cards for you?
- "Reset, restart. The last three years have been hell. I have lived in three states and 5 towns, sold, and repurchased the studio, lost some of the most important people in my life, been homeless twice, all while trying to keep nolongerhuman alive in my head. So, now is a time where I am back in the studio, rebuilding, and using those experiences to make a new album. I have a few track submissions planned, and I really would like to put together an EP, as May make 5 years for nolongerhuman. So, I may release something in limited form to commemorate. Beyond that though, I will be doing as I always do, observing humanity, and writing my opinions."


As always, we ask you to end the interview on your terms. Please use this question as a soapbox to express anything you want to say, and give a message to the readers. Thank you very much for arranging this interview, and congratulations on 'Depersonalization'! Over to you, Clint.
- "Most of what I want to say you can find in my lyrics, heh. I guess, I just think it is important for this scene, as a whole, starts listening to the music. Yes, the fashion is important, yes, being able to dance to it is great, but really listen to the music, look for the meaning that speaks to you. That's what started this genre, bands that had an agenda, a purpose. It wasn't based on horror movies, or songs about fucking. That was left to the mainstream. If you find a band that speaks to you, support it in any way you can, for as long as you can. Most of us live paycheck to paycheck like everyone else, this is something we do because we love to do it, or we need to, but it is a full time job. If you love the music, let the band know. It never goes unappreciated."
Mar 28 2012

Nick Quarm

info@brutalresonance.com
Writer and contributor on Brutal Resonance

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