Why is it that Mr Jones Machine has been around for many years but it's not until now you release your debut album?
Jouni: - "It was like this; in '98 the idea was born and together with my brother we made two songs during '98 that's not on the album. We wanted to do something together when I broke up with Pouppee Fabrikk and my brother's project Daily Planet went down the drain. It didn't happen allot in a couple of years until 2001 when we brought it up again and started to send a record to a couple of record companies. One label thought we were to retro, and that means that the label hadn't understood our thing. Another label thought it wouldn't work since it only should be futurepop in these days so they didn't understand our thing either. We produced a few more tracks and after that Magnus joined the game. In November last year I talked to Torny from Project Productions and we both agreed on that we should do collaboration and release the album. It's really not until now we feel that we have a label behind us that really know what we want to do with our music. It's been a long road to the point we are today."

When I saw you perform at Heden in a tent during the Göteborgskalaset a couple of years ago only the Olilla brothers were in the band. Why did you decide to bring in a third person?
Jouni: - "It came quite natural actually. Me and my brother talked about it and we thought it looked kind of dull with only two musicians at the stage. We simply needed a third man and that man happened to be Magnus. The funny thing was that Magnus turned out to be quite a writer of very high standard. It turned out better than we thought."
Jarmo: - "Exactly, it was really a mistake. We were not supposed to be this good. He just happened to be around. But I think the collaboration we have now is truly great."
Magnus: - "I became quite nonplussed when they asked me, but hey, I bought my first synth back in '86 and I have since then written songs, recorded them and even bought a porta studio. Simply just write songs, record them and then you find them quite fun. Then of course you have a party at your place and you get kind of hammered and with that some lack of judgement. And of course you play these songs for your friends. I have of course laughed at them but obviously these to guys heard some qualities and they thought I could bring something to the band."
Jouni: - "Absolutely. Today there's no Mr Jones Machine without Magnus."

A question for Jouni; You have earlier been a member of Pouppee Fabrikk. Still the music of Mr Jones Machine is pretty different. In which ways do you feel that you are able to use your experiences from Pouppee Fabrikk in this new form?
Jouni: - "Mr Jones Machine is closer to my origin than Pouppee Fabrikk. I started to listen to synthpop when I was a little kid and I bought my first synth album back in 1981. I think it was "Speak and Spell", so it wasn't that hard music I started out with. After that it was more bands like Front 242, Nitzer Ebb and you started to evolve your musical stile to harder music as well. And that was the way Pouppee Fabrikk was formed, but Mr Jones Machine is more of my roots in the end. You could say whatever you want about Pouppee Fabrikk, but Mr Jones Machine is much more Jarmo Olilla than Pouppee Fabrikk ever been."

Do you have any side projects or do you help other bands in some way?
Jouni: - "We have lots of side projects. The most odd side project I have is probably a band no one of you in here ever heard of called Dogville Hunt and we play stone rock. It's nice to go to a shitty local that stinks old beer, smoke some cigarettes and play hard rock. More than that I also play together with Torny Gottberg from Project-X in a new collaboration which I think will be very nice. I also play some noise music and I have some projects called Alko, Volvo 242 and MZ-412. I even help Henrik Björkk in Folkstorm and do some other remixes."
Jarmo: - "I'm in with La Vogue, but I don't say anything else since it's kind of a secret right now. More than that I also have another project, a country band called Buford T. Justice. It hasn't really happened anything, but I will be standing in Nashville some day."

How does it feel tonight when you have release party for the new record and everything?
Magnus: - "Unreal, and liberation of course."
Jouni: - "It's perfect. It's like to be reborn. We have fought and worked very hard with this album and it turned out so damn great in this collaboration that we have with Progress Productions. It's so great; people are here to listen to our record and to see us perform."
Jarmo: - "Even more great is that we have not signed a contract and that feels very nice. It was more of a handshake or actually a cheer with Jägermeister."

Tell us more about album. How did you produce it, since the album is tonight's main item?
Jouni: - "If you focus on the writing of the songs it's mainly me and my brother who have written them since Magnus joined the band in a quite late state. He has helped us out with tree or four of our tracks. Nowadays it's usually Magnus and my brothers that spend all night drinking red whine and write songs. Then Magnus record them with his new digital porta studio or an old four channel one which they used to record with. After that they visit me in Karlskoga with a cassette band which we listen to in my kitchen and it sounds really terrible."PPPZZZBBBBBZZZZZ", and all you could think is that if you were able to hear what it is it would probably sound really great. From that form we go down to the studio and produce it. When we are done with the musical part we go to a different studio to record the vocals."
Jarmo: - "We have recorded the vocals in Pontus Stålberg?s studio, the singer of Spetsnaz. It's really nice to get some "input" from another person so you don't get to focused on your own music so you can't see it from another view."
Jouni: - "I think the most important part is the way we use our instruments. It's really important to point out that it's really necessary to use the instrument in a concrete way instead of just building a mass of sounds. Instead we pitch a sound which is unique to just that keyboard and place it so you are really able to hear it and its character. If you listen to the album you could really hear that it's allot of air between the sounds. It's all about to get the heart into it."

Which artists are your biggest influences within this genre?
Magnus: - "You could say it starts out with the band ABC and ends with Zang Tum Tum, so it's actually the whole genre. This album is fifty percent salutation to our heroes. From 1975 till 1985."
Jouni: - "Jarmo and Magnus write the songs without influence and then we put the pieces together and make it sound like the 80's. The songs would really work in all genres if we didn't have that way of making the tracks. In that way it all fall into place and becomes unique without copying anything."
Jarmo: - "It's hard not to sound like some bands and they often stand behind you like some kind of ghost, but you could only hope that you have some talent so you still are able to make it sound unique."

A question to Jarmo, You have been a member of some other bands over the years, but what made you to go for Mr Jones Machine in the end?
Jarmo: - "The main reason is to work with my brother. Really, what else can I say? It's love."

A question for Magnus, in what ways is it shown that Jarmo and Jouni are brothers? Do they have any intern jokes or something like that?
Magnus: - "I have a two year younger brother of my own, so I know the jargon. They usually read their minds; finish their sentences and little things like that. First of all they are to buddies of mine so it's really not that strange and I usually follow. They have their own oddities, but you will have to live with that."

What do you guys do when you're not occupied with music?
Magnus: - "Write music."
Jarmo: - "Yeah, it is like that. You live and breathe music which is really tragic when you think of it. So it's mostly that and work of course. But when you get a little free time its music all the way."
Magnus: - "Either you listen to music, writing music or talking music. It's kind of embracing."
Jouni: - "I'm probably the one of us that does most things that's not music. I really don't know how I find the time to everything. I have a job in Stockholm and I live in Karlskoga. I have a band with to guys in Gothenburg, so I think you know how it all works out. More than that I'm a father, have a house and an adjusted Volvo with 80hp. Music and technology is my main things in life."
Mr Jones Machine interview
January 1, 2005
Brutal Resonance

Mr Jones Machine

Jan 2005
Why is it that Mr Jones Machine has been around for many years but it's not until now you release your debut album?
Jouni: - "It was like this; in '98 the idea was born and together with my brother we made two songs during '98 that's not on the album. We wanted to do something together when I broke up with Pouppee Fabrikk and my brother's project Daily Planet went down the drain. It didn't happen allot in a couple of years until 2001 when we brought it up again and started to send a record to a couple of record companies. One label thought we were to retro, and that means that the label hadn't understood our thing. Another label thought it wouldn't work since it only should be futurepop in these days so they didn't understand our thing either. We produced a few more tracks and after that Magnus joined the game. In November last year I talked to Torny from Project Productions and we both agreed on that we should do collaboration and release the album. It's really not until now we feel that we have a label behind us that really know what we want to do with our music. It's been a long road to the point we are today."

When I saw you perform at Heden in a tent during the Göteborgskalaset a couple of years ago only the Olilla brothers were in the band. Why did you decide to bring in a third person?
Jouni: - "It came quite natural actually. Me and my brother talked about it and we thought it looked kind of dull with only two musicians at the stage. We simply needed a third man and that man happened to be Magnus. The funny thing was that Magnus turned out to be quite a writer of very high standard. It turned out better than we thought."
Jarmo: - "Exactly, it was really a mistake. We were not supposed to be this good. He just happened to be around. But I think the collaboration we have now is truly great."
Magnus: - "I became quite nonplussed when they asked me, but hey, I bought my first synth back in '86 and I have since then written songs, recorded them and even bought a porta studio. Simply just write songs, record them and then you find them quite fun. Then of course you have a party at your place and you get kind of hammered and with that some lack of judgement. And of course you play these songs for your friends. I have of course laughed at them but obviously these to guys heard some qualities and they thought I could bring something to the band."
Jouni: - "Absolutely. Today there's no Mr Jones Machine without Magnus."

A question for Jouni; You have earlier been a member of Pouppee Fabrikk. Still the music of Mr Jones Machine is pretty different. In which ways do you feel that you are able to use your experiences from Pouppee Fabrikk in this new form?
Jouni: - "Mr Jones Machine is closer to my origin than Pouppee Fabrikk. I started to listen to synthpop when I was a little kid and I bought my first synth album back in 1981. I think it was "Speak and Spell", so it wasn't that hard music I started out with. After that it was more bands like Front 242, Nitzer Ebb and you started to evolve your musical stile to harder music as well. And that was the way Pouppee Fabrikk was formed, but Mr Jones Machine is more of my roots in the end. You could say whatever you want about Pouppee Fabrikk, but Mr Jones Machine is much more Jarmo Olilla than Pouppee Fabrikk ever been."

Do you have any side projects or do you help other bands in some way?
Jouni: - "We have lots of side projects. The most odd side project I have is probably a band no one of you in here ever heard of called Dogville Hunt and we play stone rock. It's nice to go to a shitty local that stinks old beer, smoke some cigarettes and play hard rock. More than that I also play together with Torny Gottberg from Project-X in a new collaboration which I think will be very nice. I also play some noise music and I have some projects called Alko, Volvo 242 and MZ-412. I even help Henrik Björkk in Folkstorm and do some other remixes."
Jarmo: - "I'm in with La Vogue, but I don't say anything else since it's kind of a secret right now. More than that I also have another project, a country band called Buford T. Justice. It hasn't really happened anything, but I will be standing in Nashville some day."

How does it feel tonight when you have release party for the new record and everything?
Magnus: - "Unreal, and liberation of course."
Jouni: - "It's perfect. It's like to be reborn. We have fought and worked very hard with this album and it turned out so damn great in this collaboration that we have with Progress Productions. It's so great; people are here to listen to our record and to see us perform."
Jarmo: - "Even more great is that we have not signed a contract and that feels very nice. It was more of a handshake or actually a cheer with Jägermeister."

Tell us more about album. How did you produce it, since the album is tonight's main item?
Jouni: - "If you focus on the writing of the songs it's mainly me and my brother who have written them since Magnus joined the band in a quite late state. He has helped us out with tree or four of our tracks. Nowadays it's usually Magnus and my brothers that spend all night drinking red whine and write songs. Then Magnus record them with his new digital porta studio or an old four channel one which they used to record with. After that they visit me in Karlskoga with a cassette band which we listen to in my kitchen and it sounds really terrible."PPPZZZBBBBBZZZZZ", and all you could think is that if you were able to hear what it is it would probably sound really great. From that form we go down to the studio and produce it. When we are done with the musical part we go to a different studio to record the vocals."
Jarmo: - "We have recorded the vocals in Pontus Stålberg?s studio, the singer of Spetsnaz. It's really nice to get some "input" from another person so you don't get to focused on your own music so you can't see it from another view."
Jouni: - "I think the most important part is the way we use our instruments. It's really important to point out that it's really necessary to use the instrument in a concrete way instead of just building a mass of sounds. Instead we pitch a sound which is unique to just that keyboard and place it so you are really able to hear it and its character. If you listen to the album you could really hear that it's allot of air between the sounds. It's all about to get the heart into it."

Which artists are your biggest influences within this genre?
Magnus: - "You could say it starts out with the band ABC and ends with Zang Tum Tum, so it's actually the whole genre. This album is fifty percent salutation to our heroes. From 1975 till 1985."
Jouni: - "Jarmo and Magnus write the songs without influence and then we put the pieces together and make it sound like the 80's. The songs would really work in all genres if we didn't have that way of making the tracks. In that way it all fall into place and becomes unique without copying anything."
Jarmo: - "It's hard not to sound like some bands and they often stand behind you like some kind of ghost, but you could only hope that you have some talent so you still are able to make it sound unique."

A question to Jarmo, You have been a member of some other bands over the years, but what made you to go for Mr Jones Machine in the end?
Jarmo: - "The main reason is to work with my brother. Really, what else can I say? It's love."

A question for Magnus, in what ways is it shown that Jarmo and Jouni are brothers? Do they have any intern jokes or something like that?
Magnus: - "I have a two year younger brother of my own, so I know the jargon. They usually read their minds; finish their sentences and little things like that. First of all they are to buddies of mine so it's really not that strange and I usually follow. They have their own oddities, but you will have to live with that."

What do you guys do when you're not occupied with music?
Magnus: - "Write music."
Jarmo: - "Yeah, it is like that. You live and breathe music which is really tragic when you think of it. So it's mostly that and work of course. But when you get a little free time its music all the way."
Magnus: - "Either you listen to music, writing music or talking music. It's kind of embracing."
Jouni: - "I'm probably the one of us that does most things that's not music. I really don't know how I find the time to everything. I have a job in Stockholm and I live in Karlskoga. I have a band with to guys in Gothenburg, so I think you know how it all works out. More than that I'm a father, have a house and an adjusted Volvo with 80hp. Music and technology is my main things in life."
Jan 01 2005

Jenny Sjöström

info@brutalresonance.com
Writer and contributor on Brutal Resonance

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Started in spring 2009, Brutal Resonance quickly grew from a Swedish based netzine into an established International zine of the highest standard.

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