There are tons of rivetheads and the like who have slowly removed themselves from the scene with a bitter attitude proclaiming that industrial is dead and that the good ol'days are long gone. Well those foul seeking mother fuckers need to shut up and get a load of some upcoming acts such as Encrypted. Hailing from San Antonio, Texas, Encrypted is a band consisting of Jude and Metal Matt. With extensive history and punk and metal bands, these two have twisted and bent synths to their will crafting music straight from the golden age of industrial. With that said I spoke with both Jude and Metal Matt about their latest EP Regression, the history of the band, as well as their influences. Check it out! 


Hi there and welcome to Brutal Resonance. You're a relatively new  act that has a complete old school industrial sound. Let's start off with the basics: who is in the band, how would you describe your sound, and what's your favorite kind of booze?

Jude:  Vocals. I think we have a forgotten sound. It's aggressive, heavy and dirty the way industrial should sound. Booze is my middle name.  Lone Star beer and Kentucky Deluxe whiskey, mixed with the wet Texas heat, helps us communicate with dark forces.
 
Metal Matt:  Synths and percussion. I would describe our sound as an early 80's to early 90's industrial sound, I write exactly the kind of music I want to hear. I'm a whiskey man and also a fan of Texas' own Lone Star beer!

Where and when did you first get into making music? Did you always have an affinity for industrial music, or did you start off by picking up a guitar or something else entirely?

Jude:  I got into making music in my teens. At first, I was in various punk bands playing guitar and bass. Over the years, I wanted to experiment more.  I thought industrial would be the perfect medium. Industrial music has few bounds and just about anything can be turned into an instrument.
 
Metal Matt:  I've been writing music since I was thirteen, and I play all kinds of instruments. My main thing was guitar and bass in death metal bands my whole life. I've liked industrial since the 5th grade but didn't have a clue on how to create it.... till now.

If you could name the most influential bands on your sound and style, who would they be and why?

Jude:  I'm sure Matt will tell you what our influences are, so I would like to say what we are not influenced by. I feel like industrial music these days is weak, there are few bands who are playing it, and it has gotten over processed. We try not to be influenced by modern electro or similar styles. We like to keep it pure and raw, stripping it down to the core of what made all of those old school bands great!
 
Metal Matt:  My most influential bands are Skinny Puppy, Ministry, Front 242, Nitzer Ebb, Einstürzende Neubauten, Laibach, Front Line Assembly, and even a little Depeche Mode. It's the old school sound I grew up on. I think electronic music today, including harsh EBM, is crap. I think it has too much of this rave sound: the same beat for every song with the same vocal style.


You have an album from last year called Prosthetic Soul. Between that release and your current self-titled release, what have you learned? Would you consider your current album better than your older material?

Jude:  We have learned so much since we started a few years back, including everything from how to mix and master industrial to how to record a synth.  It's a huge learning process. The more we press forward, the better quality our project becomes. More fantastic music is in the works!

Metal Matt:  The Prosthetic Soul release on our Bandcamp was simply a demo. Regression is a small EP with four of our mastered tracks. We are going to release the full remastered Prosthetic Soul album later this year, with the four songs on Regression, plus five new tracks.

As stated earlier, Encrypted has an extremely old school, 80s golden era sound. How did you go about writing the material for the project? Do you look back to what legendary bands such as Skinny Puppy and FLA have done, or do you take it from a completely new perspective and try to make it fit the old mold?

Jude:  I like to think our process is "anything goes". One of the things I love about the older industrial music is how versatile it is. Part of capturing the sound is being expressive and having an open mind to what "music" is. Let's face it, industrial music is anti-music. It's important to capture that aspect by striving for creativity. In this sense, it's our own perspective executed in the mind of the old influence. We keep an arsenal of strange instruments like synths, didgeridoos, metal pipes, oil barrels and electronic drums on hand.

Metal Matt:  The process varies sometimes. I write fast punk riffs on a guitar and slow it down. Other times, I'll get a melody stuck in my head and play it on synth, then expand from there. As far as the bands that influence us, we try and capture their sound. We try and fit the old mold but with our own style.

And what themes does Encrypted focus on? What do the lyrics talk about, what are you trying to say to the audience? Does it vary from song to song or is there one unifying message per release?

Jude:  Being into punk, my lyrics are politically charged.  They deal with world issues including but not limited to necro politics, genocide, famine, plague, religion, substance abuse, suicide, omnicide, ecocide, and deicide. The whole feel on our current release is an all out assault on the hypocrisy of religion. I try and open the audience's eyes to the horrors of our existence. In the end, it's but the hopeless ravings of a poor villain because, I know as well as the audience, nothing will change which is the greatest hypocrisy of all.....Death and doom my friend, an endless orgy of despair....

.
I've seen a couple of my friends raving about the new EP via Facebook and the like though it's just been released. Despite that, how do your feel about the EP yourself? Do you find it to be great, or do you see room for improvement?

Jude:  We started the project with no experience in electronic music. We didn't even know how a synth worked. I thought it would be as easy as pressing a button on your laptop. Boy, was I wrong! All we had to work with was our ultimate vision. Now that we have gained a lot more experience, I think we can better execute what we want to accomplish.  I can see us being a lot more enlightened and heavy in our next musical exploits.
 
Metal Matt:  I think it's fucking great! There is always room for improvement too. 

And what's next for Encrypted? Do you have any remixes, other albums, or anything else in the works? Any live shows that you're working on?

Jude:  We are working on our full album release and possibly a tour. We are playing in Dallas and Houston in April, and we are going back to the Colorado Goth Fest this year! Also,  another music video will be coming soon. As far as remixes, they aren't on our mind right now. We are working on a Judas Priest cover of 'Night Crawler'. It should be brutal.

This is a question of curiosity but it also helps me discover new bands as well. What bands or albums have you been listening to lately? Any new and upcoming acts you think deserve more recognition?

Jude:  Well in my album rotation I have Unrest by Disrupt, Panguna by Keluar, and VIVIsectVI by Skinny Puppy. For newer bands, there are a lot of great acts that we are starting to do shows with such Tearfull Moon from Houston and Aztec Death from Dallas. We cant forget our friends up in Colorado- Ehph and Witch Hands!

Metal Matt:  As I mentioned earlier, I'm not into anything new or up coming. However, I think Youth Code is pretty cool.  It would be cool to tour with them.

Lastly, I'd like to thank you for your time and wish you the best of luck! The space below is yours to say whatever you wish. Cheers!

Jude:  First off, thanks for the interview! We will see you again down the road! We have a special offer just for Brutal Resonance readers. If you type in the code "0666" at check out on our Bandcamp you will  receive a discount on our EP, Regression! Also remember to like and share our Facebook page! Message us for bookings or anything related. Cheers mates! We have come to fix the gear!

Encrypted interview
March 29, 2017
Brutal Resonance

Encrypted

Mar 2017
There are tons of rivetheads and the like who have slowly removed themselves from the scene with a bitter attitude proclaiming that industrial is dead and that the good ol'days are long gone. Well those foul seeking mother fuckers need to shut up and get a load of some upcoming acts such as Encrypted. Hailing from San Antonio, Texas, Encrypted is a band consisting of Jude and Metal Matt. With extensive history and punk and metal bands, these two have twisted and bent synths to their will crafting music straight from the golden age of industrial. With that said I spoke with both Jude and Metal Matt about their latest EP Regression, the history of the band, as well as their influences. Check it out! 


Hi there and welcome to Brutal Resonance. You're a relatively new  act that has a complete old school industrial sound. Let's start off with the basics: who is in the band, how would you describe your sound, and what's your favorite kind of booze?

Jude:  Vocals. I think we have a forgotten sound. It's aggressive, heavy and dirty the way industrial should sound. Booze is my middle name.  Lone Star beer and Kentucky Deluxe whiskey, mixed with the wet Texas heat, helps us communicate with dark forces.
 
Metal Matt:  Synths and percussion. I would describe our sound as an early 80's to early 90's industrial sound, I write exactly the kind of music I want to hear. I'm a whiskey man and also a fan of Texas' own Lone Star beer!

Where and when did you first get into making music? Did you always have an affinity for industrial music, or did you start off by picking up a guitar or something else entirely?

Jude:  I got into making music in my teens. At first, I was in various punk bands playing guitar and bass. Over the years, I wanted to experiment more.  I thought industrial would be the perfect medium. Industrial music has few bounds and just about anything can be turned into an instrument.
 
Metal Matt:  I've been writing music since I was thirteen, and I play all kinds of instruments. My main thing was guitar and bass in death metal bands my whole life. I've liked industrial since the 5th grade but didn't have a clue on how to create it.... till now.

If you could name the most influential bands on your sound and style, who would they be and why?

Jude:  I'm sure Matt will tell you what our influences are, so I would like to say what we are not influenced by. I feel like industrial music these days is weak, there are few bands who are playing it, and it has gotten over processed. We try not to be influenced by modern electro or similar styles. We like to keep it pure and raw, stripping it down to the core of what made all of those old school bands great!
 
Metal Matt:  My most influential bands are Skinny Puppy, Ministry, Front 242, Nitzer Ebb, Einstürzende Neubauten, Laibach, Front Line Assembly, and even a little Depeche Mode. It's the old school sound I grew up on. I think electronic music today, including harsh EBM, is crap. I think it has too much of this rave sound: the same beat for every song with the same vocal style.


You have an album from last year called Prosthetic Soul. Between that release and your current self-titled release, what have you learned? Would you consider your current album better than your older material?

Jude:  We have learned so much since we started a few years back, including everything from how to mix and master industrial to how to record a synth.  It's a huge learning process. The more we press forward, the better quality our project becomes. More fantastic music is in the works!

Metal Matt:  The Prosthetic Soul release on our Bandcamp was simply a demo. Regression is a small EP with four of our mastered tracks. We are going to release the full remastered Prosthetic Soul album later this year, with the four songs on Regression, plus five new tracks.

As stated earlier, Encrypted has an extremely old school, 80s golden era sound. How did you go about writing the material for the project? Do you look back to what legendary bands such as Skinny Puppy and FLA have done, or do you take it from a completely new perspective and try to make it fit the old mold?

Jude:  I like to think our process is "anything goes". One of the things I love about the older industrial music is how versatile it is. Part of capturing the sound is being expressive and having an open mind to what "music" is. Let's face it, industrial music is anti-music. It's important to capture that aspect by striving for creativity. In this sense, it's our own perspective executed in the mind of the old influence. We keep an arsenal of strange instruments like synths, didgeridoos, metal pipes, oil barrels and electronic drums on hand.

Metal Matt:  The process varies sometimes. I write fast punk riffs on a guitar and slow it down. Other times, I'll get a melody stuck in my head and play it on synth, then expand from there. As far as the bands that influence us, we try and capture their sound. We try and fit the old mold but with our own style.

And what themes does Encrypted focus on? What do the lyrics talk about, what are you trying to say to the audience? Does it vary from song to song or is there one unifying message per release?

Jude:  Being into punk, my lyrics are politically charged.  They deal with world issues including but not limited to necro politics, genocide, famine, plague, religion, substance abuse, suicide, omnicide, ecocide, and deicide. The whole feel on our current release is an all out assault on the hypocrisy of religion. I try and open the audience's eyes to the horrors of our existence. In the end, it's but the hopeless ravings of a poor villain because, I know as well as the audience, nothing will change which is the greatest hypocrisy of all.....Death and doom my friend, an endless orgy of despair....

.
I've seen a couple of my friends raving about the new EP via Facebook and the like though it's just been released. Despite that, how do your feel about the EP yourself? Do you find it to be great, or do you see room for improvement?

Jude:  We started the project with no experience in electronic music. We didn't even know how a synth worked. I thought it would be as easy as pressing a button on your laptop. Boy, was I wrong! All we had to work with was our ultimate vision. Now that we have gained a lot more experience, I think we can better execute what we want to accomplish.  I can see us being a lot more enlightened and heavy in our next musical exploits.
 
Metal Matt:  I think it's fucking great! There is always room for improvement too. 

And what's next for Encrypted? Do you have any remixes, other albums, or anything else in the works? Any live shows that you're working on?

Jude:  We are working on our full album release and possibly a tour. We are playing in Dallas and Houston in April, and we are going back to the Colorado Goth Fest this year! Also,  another music video will be coming soon. As far as remixes, they aren't on our mind right now. We are working on a Judas Priest cover of 'Night Crawler'. It should be brutal.

This is a question of curiosity but it also helps me discover new bands as well. What bands or albums have you been listening to lately? Any new and upcoming acts you think deserve more recognition?

Jude:  Well in my album rotation I have Unrest by Disrupt, Panguna by Keluar, and VIVIsectVI by Skinny Puppy. For newer bands, there are a lot of great acts that we are starting to do shows with such Tearfull Moon from Houston and Aztec Death from Dallas. We cant forget our friends up in Colorado- Ehph and Witch Hands!

Metal Matt:  As I mentioned earlier, I'm not into anything new or up coming. However, I think Youth Code is pretty cool.  It would be cool to tour with them.

Lastly, I'd like to thank you for your time and wish you the best of luck! The space below is yours to say whatever you wish. Cheers!

Jude:  First off, thanks for the interview! We will see you again down the road! We have a special offer just for Brutal Resonance readers. If you type in the code "0666" at check out on our Bandcamp you will  receive a discount on our EP, Regression! Also remember to like and share our Facebook page! Message us for bookings or anything related. Cheers mates! We have come to fix the gear!

Mar 29 2017

Steven Gullotta

info@brutalresonance.com
I've been writing for Brutal Resonance since November of 2012 and now serve as the editor-in-chief. I love the dark electronic underground and usually have too much to listen to at once but I love it. I am also an editor at Aggressive Deprivation, a digital/physical magazine since March of 2016. I support the scene as much as I can from my humble laptop.

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Shortly about us

Started in spring 2009, Brutal Resonance quickly grew from a Swedish based netzine into an established International zine of the highest standard.

We cover genres like Synthpop, EBM, Industrial, Dark Ambient, Neofolk, Darkwave, Noise and all their sub- and similar genres.

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