For followers of this site, you may remember when, back in May of 2014, I reviewed The Takeover Project 's Dominion, an album from Matthew Adams now dead project. In this interview, I discuss with him the death of his old project, and the birth of his latest baby, Dark Machine Nation, as well as his forthcoming album under that name.

Okay, let's start off with some basics. Your musical project The Takeover Project was introduced on the site earlier, however, for anyone who may have missed that, could we have a bit of history behind yourself and your musical endeavors?

Matthew - "Well, I've been toying with music since maybe 12 or so, starting with a Radio Shack--level arranger keyboard, and then moving on to midi based computer production. This took me well into college and beyond on a few different computer platforms, including Mac and now PC, which I will continue to use into the foreseeable future.

As far as my non-electronic music background, being raised religious, I sang in choirs as a kid into my young adulthood in college, so I've always known how to use my voice. Adapting that voice to my trademark sound is what took many years, but I am glad to say, I've found my niche, vocally and musically."

I remember while researching you that you stated that you had been producing music since your early teen years. Which bands really kinda pushed you into wanting to create your own music? Or was it more self motivation to start crafting?

Matthew - "Early on I was inspired by god-awful euro dance music like Eiffel 65, Aqua and whatever else was on the radio that my parents would approve of me listening to.

As I grew into my mid-teens, my taste in electronica became harder and darker, moving from Trance to Drum n' Bass [DJ Dieselboy] and finally to Gabber, Hardcore, and Speedcore [Angerfist, Ophidian, Omar Santana, DJ Tron, Delta 9].

In college, I grew into Death Metal [Nile, The Berzerker, Demon Hunter], and Electro-Industrial/Gothic Metal [Grendel, Angelspit, Joachim Witt], and now I listen to all of these in rotation among other things."

Anyway, it was in 2008 that your now dead powernoise act The Takeover Project first started. First of all, where did that name come from and when did you decide to formally get a name out there for the public? Did you finally feel as if you had enough experience to put out a release people would enjoy?

Matthew - "I was raised very in a very religious environment. My tastes in music were very much outside of that, but I maintained my faith in those days nonetheless. The name 'The Takeover Project' was partly a college nickname and part religious arrogance.

To make a long story very short, I was given the name 'The Takeover' in a college poetry club due to my dominating and megalomaniacal lyrical theme and delivery style. I added 'project' to that to remind myself at the time that I was a 'work in progress' in the hands of a god I no longer believe in.

The name also referred to the prophesied 'supremacy of Christ,' that one day he would return and 'take over' the world for his glory. As I was studying to be a minister, religion had crawled its way into my music. I can say that it very greatly spoiled my creativity.

To answer your second question, I ironically never released anything until I decidedly gave up on religion and the god of my upbringing a little over three years ago. The first album was called 'Perceptor,' and it is actually still online at https://darkmachinenation.bandcamp.com/album/perceptor . After that album, I changed from the melodic gabber sound I was working with before and when to full-on Power Noise production."

And you spent six years with that project and its name. Tell me, as a bit of a nostalgia trip, what were some of your favorite moments while under The Takeover Project name? Did anything really stick out?

Matthew - "In short, Summer Masquerade Ball in Washington, DC. It was my first real gig under the name, in July of 2013, and the set I played, while haphazard, was well received and I enjoyed playing it. I also met a good friend of mine, Mark, otherwise known as Hardware EST, who DJs for clubrenoize.com.

It was a great time that will be hard to match. Mostly because Mark is an amazing cook."

And this is where curiosity plays in most: Why did you decide to shut down The Takeover Project and move onto a new alias? Why not just stay with something you've developed over the past six years?

Matthew - "What I built over the last six years was built on a lie.

The name 'The Takeover Project' absorbed a great deal of my own negative energy, such that playing gigs under the name felt like an on-stage death sentence. Many times I would be playing a set while experiencing a depressive episode which nearly pushed me to quitting music altogether. It was a dark time in my life in 2013 when many aspects of my life were in great upheaval. I had to let the name go.

On a business note, the name 'The Takeover Project' would more commonly be shortened to 'TKVRPRJCT,' which while being highly distinct, it is also indecipherable, unmarketable, and unmemorable. I needed something simple, and Dark Machine Nation came out of my mind. Problem solved.

Dark Machine Nation also shortens to DMN or 'Demon' if you choose to say it that way. This very well matches the hyper-powered and mythological theme I'm going with for this project."

Was there any sort of internal hardship or struggle when deciding to put to rest your first project? Or was it something that you prepared for a long while?

Matthew - "I suppose I've answered that above. But I will add that I cannot express how much I now hate that name."

And, as of right now, I see that the Bandcamp page for The Takeover Project is down. Do you ever have plans to release a complete collection of all works done under that name through your new project?

Matthew - "All albums are still online at: https://darkmachinenation.bandcamp.com

Sometimes I do rework one of my old tracks and use it in a new album, or for a remix, but generally the rework is so drastic that it sounds nothing like the original track."

And that pushes me further in your timeline. You have a new project that's been fully merged just about a week ago. Tell us about the project.

Matthew - "Dark Machine Nation is meant to be a clearer sound and image of what I believe in and what I see in the world around me. The production will be clearer and more polished, but still aggressive. The sound and the lyrics will be darker. I'll be pushing myself as a DJ more, and not as much as a producer, and I hope to be much more marketable under this name.

Check me out at https://www.facebook.com/darkmachinenation."

Now, in terms of sound, what are you planning on doing to make Dark Machine Nation different from The Takeover Project? Or is it going to be a sort of spiritual successor and similar in sound?

Matthew - "I will use some of the same elements of sound as my old project, but I am aiming for much better production and more of a lyrical focus. In fact, all of the tracks on my upcoming album will feature lyrics or vocal samples of some type.

A big difference is, I am not shying away from using melodies in certain tracks where it is effective. So, this is somewhat a diversion from my short-lived noise project. But don't worry, I'll be making more tracks with a bare-bones kick sound. I am always seeking to master the 'art of noise.'"

Will this project still remain a solo project, or do you have plans on adding additional minds to the project?

Matthew - "I have, at the moment, two remixers and one guest vocalist online. Lights Out God Help Me and Dre Hectik [formerly of Hardcore label H2Oh Recordings] are in progress on my remixes, and I have received and am currently toying with vocals from an R n' b singer/ voiceover artist friend of mine, Devonnia. She's awesome, by the way.

https://soundcloud.com/lights-out-god-help-me
https://soundcloud.com/dre-hectizio
https://soundcloud.com/lookingupwardnonward"

And, revisiting talk of The Takeover Project's releases, do you have any plans to revisit old material and rework them to be involved with future releases that DMN might put out?

Matthew - "Currently, I am reworking an old track by The Takeover Project, formerly called 'XXX.' as a backstory, that track was an anti-pornography noise track. I am reworking it into a new track called 'Wrath of the Serpent,' which is a furious ode to both modern Satanism as well as my own personal decision to never be a slave of either religion or my own limitations again!"

Even more exciting news is that you have some new material in the works. In fact, it was just recently that you uploaded the track Leviathan via Soundcloud. It seems like the experimental nature of industrial mixed with doomcore sounds. Could you tell us more about how you came to write the song and what you were aiming to do with it?

Matthew - "Well, as I've hinted, I am indeed pushing a message here, in short, 'power of self.' The word 'Leviathan' is a serpent beast of the biblical tradition. It was adopted as one of the 'four princes of hell' in Anton LaVey's The Satanic Bible, a book that has inspired me greatly as of late. I take the name upon myself, invoking upon myself it's beast-like qualities, and with that I inspire my mind to manifest power to live my life.

Musically, it's a well-mastered kickdrum onslaught based on an unfinished track I had sitting around for months. I'm proud to see it finished, and even more excited to hear the upcoming remix from Lights Out God help Me. Stay tuned..."

Now, also, you have announced that this song is set to appear on the full length album. Along with that, two other song titles have been announced, which are Blade of Hate and Mandatory Alienation Protocol. Are there any further details that you can announce about the album? Title, full track list, when it's set to release?

Matthew - "Besides those three, which are more or less the 'star tracks' of the album, I have other heavy-hitters underway. I've already mentioned 'Wrath of the Serpent,' and a more emotional track 'Goddess' is releasing along with it.

I have remixes I've done for Virtual Terrorist [of iVardensphere] and Silent Heretic [Now known as Eyes of the Naga] which will also be included. Lastly, I've remixed a local band called Hexadiode, their track 'Destination' will appear on my new album, with my modifications added. More to be announced!"

And, furthering plans with DMN, are you planning on playing any live shows to promote the new act and its material, or are you just looking towards online distribution for now?

Matthew - "Live performance has always been my dream, and I'm planning a more engaging live show featuring audiovisuals, live vocals, and perhaps even live performers! I plan to take this far beyond a DJ show while staying true to the art of DJing and to myself as well. However, there will of course be an online release, and perhaps a physical release as well, if everything goes according to plan. Fingers crossed."

Is there anything that I haven't covered that you wish to address at this time?

Matthew - "I'd like to say that my project will always be a progressive one. My current inspiration stems from modern Satanism, but it will not stop there. To those who don't know, now you know. The brimstone mechanism is here to stay!

Dark Machine Nation, rise!!"

Lastly, I thank you for your time on our site, and wish you the best for the future.

Matthew - "Thank you very much."
Dark Machine Nation interview
February 18, 2015
Brutal Resonance

Dark Machine Nation

Feb 2015
For followers of this site, you may remember when, back in May of 2014, I reviewed The Takeover Project 's Dominion, an album from Matthew Adams now dead project. In this interview, I discuss with him the death of his old project, and the birth of his latest baby, Dark Machine Nation, as well as his forthcoming album under that name.

Okay, let's start off with some basics. Your musical project The Takeover Project was introduced on the site earlier, however, for anyone who may have missed that, could we have a bit of history behind yourself and your musical endeavors?

Matthew - "Well, I've been toying with music since maybe 12 or so, starting with a Radio Shack--level arranger keyboard, and then moving on to midi based computer production. This took me well into college and beyond on a few different computer platforms, including Mac and now PC, which I will continue to use into the foreseeable future.

As far as my non-electronic music background, being raised religious, I sang in choirs as a kid into my young adulthood in college, so I've always known how to use my voice. Adapting that voice to my trademark sound is what took many years, but I am glad to say, I've found my niche, vocally and musically."

I remember while researching you that you stated that you had been producing music since your early teen years. Which bands really kinda pushed you into wanting to create your own music? Or was it more self motivation to start crafting?

Matthew - "Early on I was inspired by god-awful euro dance music like Eiffel 65, Aqua and whatever else was on the radio that my parents would approve of me listening to.

As I grew into my mid-teens, my taste in electronica became harder and darker, moving from Trance to Drum n' Bass [DJ Dieselboy] and finally to Gabber, Hardcore, and Speedcore [Angerfist, Ophidian, Omar Santana, DJ Tron, Delta 9].

In college, I grew into Death Metal [Nile, The Berzerker, Demon Hunter], and Electro-Industrial/Gothic Metal [Grendel, Angelspit, Joachim Witt], and now I listen to all of these in rotation among other things."

Anyway, it was in 2008 that your now dead powernoise act The Takeover Project first started. First of all, where did that name come from and when did you decide to formally get a name out there for the public? Did you finally feel as if you had enough experience to put out a release people would enjoy?

Matthew - "I was raised very in a very religious environment. My tastes in music were very much outside of that, but I maintained my faith in those days nonetheless. The name 'The Takeover Project' was partly a college nickname and part religious arrogance.

To make a long story very short, I was given the name 'The Takeover' in a college poetry club due to my dominating and megalomaniacal lyrical theme and delivery style. I added 'project' to that to remind myself at the time that I was a 'work in progress' in the hands of a god I no longer believe in.

The name also referred to the prophesied 'supremacy of Christ,' that one day he would return and 'take over' the world for his glory. As I was studying to be a minister, religion had crawled its way into my music. I can say that it very greatly spoiled my creativity.

To answer your second question, I ironically never released anything until I decidedly gave up on religion and the god of my upbringing a little over three years ago. The first album was called 'Perceptor,' and it is actually still online at https://darkmachinenation.bandcamp.com/album/perceptor . After that album, I changed from the melodic gabber sound I was working with before and when to full-on Power Noise production."

And you spent six years with that project and its name. Tell me, as a bit of a nostalgia trip, what were some of your favorite moments while under The Takeover Project name? Did anything really stick out?

Matthew - "In short, Summer Masquerade Ball in Washington, DC. It was my first real gig under the name, in July of 2013, and the set I played, while haphazard, was well received and I enjoyed playing it. I also met a good friend of mine, Mark, otherwise known as Hardware EST, who DJs for clubrenoize.com.

It was a great time that will be hard to match. Mostly because Mark is an amazing cook."

And this is where curiosity plays in most: Why did you decide to shut down The Takeover Project and move onto a new alias? Why not just stay with something you've developed over the past six years?

Matthew - "What I built over the last six years was built on a lie.

The name 'The Takeover Project' absorbed a great deal of my own negative energy, such that playing gigs under the name felt like an on-stage death sentence. Many times I would be playing a set while experiencing a depressive episode which nearly pushed me to quitting music altogether. It was a dark time in my life in 2013 when many aspects of my life were in great upheaval. I had to let the name go.

On a business note, the name 'The Takeover Project' would more commonly be shortened to 'TKVRPRJCT,' which while being highly distinct, it is also indecipherable, unmarketable, and unmemorable. I needed something simple, and Dark Machine Nation came out of my mind. Problem solved.

Dark Machine Nation also shortens to DMN or 'Demon' if you choose to say it that way. This very well matches the hyper-powered and mythological theme I'm going with for this project."

Was there any sort of internal hardship or struggle when deciding to put to rest your first project? Or was it something that you prepared for a long while?

Matthew - "I suppose I've answered that above. But I will add that I cannot express how much I now hate that name."

And, as of right now, I see that the Bandcamp page for The Takeover Project is down. Do you ever have plans to release a complete collection of all works done under that name through your new project?

Matthew - "All albums are still online at: https://darkmachinenation.bandcamp.com

Sometimes I do rework one of my old tracks and use it in a new album, or for a remix, but generally the rework is so drastic that it sounds nothing like the original track."

And that pushes me further in your timeline. You have a new project that's been fully merged just about a week ago. Tell us about the project.

Matthew - "Dark Machine Nation is meant to be a clearer sound and image of what I believe in and what I see in the world around me. The production will be clearer and more polished, but still aggressive. The sound and the lyrics will be darker. I'll be pushing myself as a DJ more, and not as much as a producer, and I hope to be much more marketable under this name.

Check me out at https://www.facebook.com/darkmachinenation."

Now, in terms of sound, what are you planning on doing to make Dark Machine Nation different from The Takeover Project? Or is it going to be a sort of spiritual successor and similar in sound?

Matthew - "I will use some of the same elements of sound as my old project, but I am aiming for much better production and more of a lyrical focus. In fact, all of the tracks on my upcoming album will feature lyrics or vocal samples of some type.

A big difference is, I am not shying away from using melodies in certain tracks where it is effective. So, this is somewhat a diversion from my short-lived noise project. But don't worry, I'll be making more tracks with a bare-bones kick sound. I am always seeking to master the 'art of noise.'"

Will this project still remain a solo project, or do you have plans on adding additional minds to the project?

Matthew - "I have, at the moment, two remixers and one guest vocalist online. Lights Out God Help Me and Dre Hectik [formerly of Hardcore label H2Oh Recordings] are in progress on my remixes, and I have received and am currently toying with vocals from an R n' b singer/ voiceover artist friend of mine, Devonnia. She's awesome, by the way.

https://soundcloud.com/lights-out-god-help-me
https://soundcloud.com/dre-hectizio
https://soundcloud.com/lookingupwardnonward"

And, revisiting talk of The Takeover Project's releases, do you have any plans to revisit old material and rework them to be involved with future releases that DMN might put out?

Matthew - "Currently, I am reworking an old track by The Takeover Project, formerly called 'XXX.' as a backstory, that track was an anti-pornography noise track. I am reworking it into a new track called 'Wrath of the Serpent,' which is a furious ode to both modern Satanism as well as my own personal decision to never be a slave of either religion or my own limitations again!"

Even more exciting news is that you have some new material in the works. In fact, it was just recently that you uploaded the track Leviathan via Soundcloud. It seems like the experimental nature of industrial mixed with doomcore sounds. Could you tell us more about how you came to write the song and what you were aiming to do with it?

Matthew - "Well, as I've hinted, I am indeed pushing a message here, in short, 'power of self.' The word 'Leviathan' is a serpent beast of the biblical tradition. It was adopted as one of the 'four princes of hell' in Anton LaVey's The Satanic Bible, a book that has inspired me greatly as of late. I take the name upon myself, invoking upon myself it's beast-like qualities, and with that I inspire my mind to manifest power to live my life.

Musically, it's a well-mastered kickdrum onslaught based on an unfinished track I had sitting around for months. I'm proud to see it finished, and even more excited to hear the upcoming remix from Lights Out God help Me. Stay tuned..."

Now, also, you have announced that this song is set to appear on the full length album. Along with that, two other song titles have been announced, which are Blade of Hate and Mandatory Alienation Protocol. Are there any further details that you can announce about the album? Title, full track list, when it's set to release?

Matthew - "Besides those three, which are more or less the 'star tracks' of the album, I have other heavy-hitters underway. I've already mentioned 'Wrath of the Serpent,' and a more emotional track 'Goddess' is releasing along with it.

I have remixes I've done for Virtual Terrorist [of iVardensphere] and Silent Heretic [Now known as Eyes of the Naga] which will also be included. Lastly, I've remixed a local band called Hexadiode, their track 'Destination' will appear on my new album, with my modifications added. More to be announced!"

And, furthering plans with DMN, are you planning on playing any live shows to promote the new act and its material, or are you just looking towards online distribution for now?

Matthew - "Live performance has always been my dream, and I'm planning a more engaging live show featuring audiovisuals, live vocals, and perhaps even live performers! I plan to take this far beyond a DJ show while staying true to the art of DJing and to myself as well. However, there will of course be an online release, and perhaps a physical release as well, if everything goes according to plan. Fingers crossed."

Is there anything that I haven't covered that you wish to address at this time?

Matthew - "I'd like to say that my project will always be a progressive one. My current inspiration stems from modern Satanism, but it will not stop there. To those who don't know, now you know. The brimstone mechanism is here to stay!

Dark Machine Nation, rise!!"

Lastly, I thank you for your time on our site, and wish you the best for the future.

Matthew - "Thank you very much."
Feb 18 2015

Steven Gullotta

info@brutalresonance.com
I've been writing for Brutal Resonance since November of 2012 and now serve as the editor-in-chief. I love the dark electronic underground and usually have too much to listen to at once but I love it. I am also an editor at Aggressive Deprivation, a digital/physical magazine since March of 2016. I support the scene as much as I can from my humble laptop.

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