Since we don't hear much about/from Russia, my first question is what the scene like in Russia?
- "Frankly speaking, I don't pay much attention to the local scene, although Cyclotimia is often reckon in industrial, electronic or even goth scene. Still, I know it exists, and even grows quite fast."

What was the industrial scene like in 1998 when you formed Cyclotimia and how has it changed over the years, if it has changed?
- "Back in 1998 there were really few bands in Russia playing some kind of dark music. Lots of gothic and industrial bands seem to have emerged since that time, but, unfortunately, as I already mentioned - I'm not in enough to tell you something essential about it. We are a bit isolated from the world around."

What is the situation like for musicians in Russia today? How are you affected?
- "Well, for the last five years the situation has really improved. Our government, just like in old communist times, supports creativity of any kind, so you can expect some cool grants, especially in the beginning of your career. Our old friends from the band DVAR spent it on hard drugs, girls, and Italian cars, as the result they've got pretty shitty sound quality on their first album. Other musicians usually spend grants more wisely - create their own studio, hire good sound engineers, etc. The most important thing is that global music market has no boundaries and, in fact, the origin of music doesn't matter at all anymore."

True, I think it's good that the boundaries are gone. Internet is a great opportunity. What do you think of music spreading on the internet? Should we be able to buy music online like on Apples iTunes etc or what about file sharing programs? Good or bad?
- "I don't really like that music products go virtual. Of course, people should be free to choose how to buy music, and the artists - how to spread it. But, as consumers of different music, I always buy CD's - because in my opinion it is cool to have a physical product with the cover art, etc. Otherwise it loses a bit of its charm and becomes quite faceless."

How was it to grow up in Russia and how has it affected your music?
- "We grew up under the golden reign of communism. Red stars, pioneer neckties... Now, when I see a young generation I feel a bit pity for them - yes, they play cool PC games, watch Hollywood cartoons, and eat Western candies - they are deprived of that romanticism that we had in our time. Also, I think that our music is deeply Slavonic in its heart, deeply Soviet."

Do you miss the old times, or do you feel that the changes have been good?
- "Well, the Soviet period for sure had its attractive points. Although, I don't miss them. The Empire was weak in its last years, and it had to die sooner or later, anyway. But, today's Russia is being ruled by some dirty scumbags, usurers, rogues, traitors and pilferers. That's not the best alternative."

Where do you get your inspiration and which are your influences?
- "We get inspirations from the real life. To counterbalance the Vangelis' album 'The City' which in my opinion doesn't reflect the modern city atmosphere, Wasteland was inspired by our native city - Moscow, which is becoming from day to day a hellish Western-like megapolis, with skyscrapers, banks, crowds, traffic jams, and all that stuff. Compositions on our recent album 'Eschaton' were inspired by Western business and religious TV channels. It is our unpretentious attempt to create a soundtrack for them."

I'd like to know your point of view on your own work.
- "As time passes, I always feel a bit dissatisfied with the past albums - feel that some elements of our work could have been done better. Anyway, I find that 'Wasteland', 'Same Time Same Place', 'Metamorphosis', 'Trivial Pleasures' are nice pieces of interesting music. And, I feel satisfied with them for at least 90%. On the other hand, I wouldn't recommend our first album New Death Order to anyone now - it's too typical and boring. Don't buy it!"

Which of your releases is the best one? The one you are most satisfied with.
- "Definitely, the most recent one!"

When I took a look at your homepage, the flash version, there is some kind of message there, but I'm unsure of what you are trying to say. Could you explain what you mean there?
- "Our flash site is a bit ironic. Some may think it's about anti-globalism... Well, in fact, we're not an ideological band, and we don't do a brainwashing through our music. So, there's no direct message in it - everyone can find something own in our sounds. Just as punks are getting inspired by garbage's, skinheads - by foreigners, goths - by cemeteries, we're getting inspired by banks, financial indicators, microchips, mass media, luxury things.

When not playing music, what do you do then? Or is it a full time occupation?
- "Although our country loves and supports us, it's far not enough to cover our increasing needs... That's why we have to work hard besides making music. As for me, I work in a financial company dealing with stocks and bonds. By the way, the composition "Stock Market" was inspired by my company office. Leonid works in a company dealing with computers."

And the future for Cyclotimia, what does it look like? I'd like to hear more releases from you in the future.
- "Well, there are a lot of plans. First of all - the Western editions of 'Eschaton' and CD-single 'Algorithms'; a compilation CD 'TimeBank' via the Italian Old Europa Cafe in the beginning of 2005 - it will feature many exclusive tracks from 1998 to 2003 years; a second part of 'L'electronique Mondial' trilogy, MCD 'Music For Stockmarkets'."

Now, finally, I thought you could recommend some good Russian artists.
- "Sure. First of all, a great neo-classic band Caprice, whose music I like a lot. DVAR - mystics, drug addicts, perverts, cool bizarre musicians in fact. Industrial acts like Cisfinitum, Reutoff, and Solarsalt are definitely recommended to people into deep noise muzak. Cult new wave megamithantropic band Televisor. Old post-punk bands like Kino, Auktsyon. Well, there is definitely some other, but I can't remember them at the moment."

This interview was made 2004 and initially published on Neurozine.com
Cyclotimia interview
January 1, 2004
Brutal Resonance

Cyclotimia

Jan 2004
Since we don't hear much about/from Russia, my first question is what the scene like in Russia?
- "Frankly speaking, I don't pay much attention to the local scene, although Cyclotimia is often reckon in industrial, electronic or even goth scene. Still, I know it exists, and even grows quite fast."

What was the industrial scene like in 1998 when you formed Cyclotimia and how has it changed over the years, if it has changed?
- "Back in 1998 there were really few bands in Russia playing some kind of dark music. Lots of gothic and industrial bands seem to have emerged since that time, but, unfortunately, as I already mentioned - I'm not in enough to tell you something essential about it. We are a bit isolated from the world around."

What is the situation like for musicians in Russia today? How are you affected?
- "Well, for the last five years the situation has really improved. Our government, just like in old communist times, supports creativity of any kind, so you can expect some cool grants, especially in the beginning of your career. Our old friends from the band DVAR spent it on hard drugs, girls, and Italian cars, as the result they've got pretty shitty sound quality on their first album. Other musicians usually spend grants more wisely - create their own studio, hire good sound engineers, etc. The most important thing is that global music market has no boundaries and, in fact, the origin of music doesn't matter at all anymore."

True, I think it's good that the boundaries are gone. Internet is a great opportunity. What do you think of music spreading on the internet? Should we be able to buy music online like on Apples iTunes etc or what about file sharing programs? Good or bad?
- "I don't really like that music products go virtual. Of course, people should be free to choose how to buy music, and the artists - how to spread it. But, as consumers of different music, I always buy CD's - because in my opinion it is cool to have a physical product with the cover art, etc. Otherwise it loses a bit of its charm and becomes quite faceless."

How was it to grow up in Russia and how has it affected your music?
- "We grew up under the golden reign of communism. Red stars, pioneer neckties... Now, when I see a young generation I feel a bit pity for them - yes, they play cool PC games, watch Hollywood cartoons, and eat Western candies - they are deprived of that romanticism that we had in our time. Also, I think that our music is deeply Slavonic in its heart, deeply Soviet."

Do you miss the old times, or do you feel that the changes have been good?
- "Well, the Soviet period for sure had its attractive points. Although, I don't miss them. The Empire was weak in its last years, and it had to die sooner or later, anyway. But, today's Russia is being ruled by some dirty scumbags, usurers, rogues, traitors and pilferers. That's not the best alternative."

Where do you get your inspiration and which are your influences?
- "We get inspirations from the real life. To counterbalance the Vangelis' album 'The City' which in my opinion doesn't reflect the modern city atmosphere, Wasteland was inspired by our native city - Moscow, which is becoming from day to day a hellish Western-like megapolis, with skyscrapers, banks, crowds, traffic jams, and all that stuff. Compositions on our recent album 'Eschaton' were inspired by Western business and religious TV channels. It is our unpretentious attempt to create a soundtrack for them."

I'd like to know your point of view on your own work.
- "As time passes, I always feel a bit dissatisfied with the past albums - feel that some elements of our work could have been done better. Anyway, I find that 'Wasteland', 'Same Time Same Place', 'Metamorphosis', 'Trivial Pleasures' are nice pieces of interesting music. And, I feel satisfied with them for at least 90%. On the other hand, I wouldn't recommend our first album New Death Order to anyone now - it's too typical and boring. Don't buy it!"

Which of your releases is the best one? The one you are most satisfied with.
- "Definitely, the most recent one!"

When I took a look at your homepage, the flash version, there is some kind of message there, but I'm unsure of what you are trying to say. Could you explain what you mean there?
- "Our flash site is a bit ironic. Some may think it's about anti-globalism... Well, in fact, we're not an ideological band, and we don't do a brainwashing through our music. So, there's no direct message in it - everyone can find something own in our sounds. Just as punks are getting inspired by garbage's, skinheads - by foreigners, goths - by cemeteries, we're getting inspired by banks, financial indicators, microchips, mass media, luxury things.

When not playing music, what do you do then? Or is it a full time occupation?
- "Although our country loves and supports us, it's far not enough to cover our increasing needs... That's why we have to work hard besides making music. As for me, I work in a financial company dealing with stocks and bonds. By the way, the composition "Stock Market" was inspired by my company office. Leonid works in a company dealing with computers."

And the future for Cyclotimia, what does it look like? I'd like to hear more releases from you in the future.
- "Well, there are a lot of plans. First of all - the Western editions of 'Eschaton' and CD-single 'Algorithms'; a compilation CD 'TimeBank' via the Italian Old Europa Cafe in the beginning of 2005 - it will feature many exclusive tracks from 1998 to 2003 years; a second part of 'L'electronique Mondial' trilogy, MCD 'Music For Stockmarkets'."

Now, finally, I thought you could recommend some good Russian artists.
- "Sure. First of all, a great neo-classic band Caprice, whose music I like a lot. DVAR - mystics, drug addicts, perverts, cool bizarre musicians in fact. Industrial acts like Cisfinitum, Reutoff, and Solarsalt are definitely recommended to people into deep noise muzak. Cult new wave megamithantropic band Televisor. Old post-punk bands like Kino, Auktsyon. Well, there is definitely some other, but I can't remember them at the moment."

This interview was made 2004 and initially published on Neurozine.com
Jan 01 2004

John Wikström

info@brutalresonance.com
Writer and contributor on Brutal Resonance

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